No meeting on Oct. 8th.

The 254th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Oct. 15, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

 Andrew Hemingway on “True fantasy is the most genuine mirror of the present.” Georg Scholz’s New Objectivity of 1923 in Baden

At the end of 1918 the artist Georg Scholz returned from his wartime service to the small town of Grötzingen, just outside Karlsruhe where he had trained at the Academy and where his artistic career was mainly to unfold. In short order Scholz – who had shown no clear political inclinations previously – joined the antiwar Independent Socialist Party and then the Communist Party – although he did not stay in either long. At the same time his art went through a rapid sequence of stylistic mutations before he adopted the Neue Sachclichkeit [New Objectivity] idiom for which he is best known in the mid 1920s. In this lecture I use Scholz’s evolution to chart the options open to a would-be revolutionary artist struggling to make a living in the disastrous postwar economic climate and consider the links between Scholz’s practice as a painter and his work as a print-maker, illustrator, and graphic artist. I will focus particularly on the two paintings Baden Small Town by Day and German Small Town by Night as a Dadaistic critique of the cult of homeland.

Professor Andrew Hemingway

Andrew Hemingway is Professor Emeritus in History of Art at University College London, where he taught from 1987 to his retirement in 2010. He has held visiting appointments at Northwestern University, the City University of New York, and the Freie Universität in Berlin. Hemingway has written widely on British Romantic art and art theory and on U.S. art of the early twentieth century. His books include: Landscape Imagery and Urban Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain (1992), Artists on the Left: American Artists and the Communist Movement, 1926-1956 (2002), The Mysticism of Money: Precisionist Painting and Machine Age America (2012), and Landscape Between Ideology and the Aesthetic: Marxist Essays on British Art and Art Theory, 1750-1850 (2017).  His most recent book, co-edited with Malcolm Baker, is Art as Worldmaking: Critical Essays on Realism and Naturalism (2018). He was for twelve years an editor of the Oxford Art Journal and since 1998 has been a contributing editor to Kunst und Politik. Jahrbuch der Guernica-Gesellschaft.

Picture1

Advertisements

The 253rd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Oct. 1, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

Special New School 100th Anniversary event.

Andrew Hemingway on Meyer Schapiro and the New School: From the Popular Front to the Cold War

In the winter of 1937, Meyer Schapiro published a critical review, “Nature of Abstract Art,” in the Marxist Quarterly, organ of the self-styled American Marxist Association, which had an address on West 90th Street. This review achieved almost legendary reputation among art historians as a critical demolition of formalist interpretations of modern art. Beginning in the 1970s, a new wave of social historians of art interested in Schapiro’s Marxist past noted that he had already mooted basic theses of “Nature of Abstract Art” in a paper read at the First American Artists’ Congress on 15 February 1936 in the New School for Social Research. The American Artists Congress was a communist front organization and its foundation can be understood as a manifestation of the Communist Party’s Popular Front strategy. What has passed largely unnoticed is that Schapiro had actually advanced the same arguments in the fall of 1935 in a course of six lectures on “The Content of Modern Art” at the New School.

This lecture will reconstitute Schapiro’s 1935 course from his notes and consider his arguments in relation to the politics of the moment. It will also set it against Schapiro’s later lecture courses at the New School from the 1940s and 1950s and consider them as an index of the changing political situation and his responses to it.

Andrew Hemingway is Professor Emeritus in History of Art at University College London, where he taught from 1987 to his retirement in 2010. He has held visiting appointments at Northwestern University, the City University of New York, and the Freie Universität in Berlin. Hemingway has written widely on British Romantic art and art theory and on U.S. art of the early twentieth century. His books include: Landscape Imagery and Urban Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain (1992), Artists on the Left: American Artists and the Communist Movement, 1926-1956 (2002), The Mysticism of Money: Precisionist Painting and Machine Age America (2012), and Landscape Between Ideology and the Aesthetic: Marxist Essays on British Art and Art Theory, 1750-1850 (2017).  His most recent book, co-edited with Malcolm Baker, is Art as Worldmaking: Critical Essays on Realism and Naturalism (2018). He was for twelve years an editor of the Oxford Art Journal and since 1998 has been a contributing editor to Kunst und Politik. Jahrbuch der Guernica-Gesellschaft.

schapiro detail

 

 

The 252nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Sept. 24, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

Kristin Texeira on MEMORY MAPPING, MANIFESTATION, AND THE INFINITE EXPLORATION OF TIME.

Paintings that act as time machines, anecdotes and proof of the power of manifestation, discovering source material to explore through art for a lifetime. The talk will be a chronological timeline of first inclinations to color, through school, to art residencies/travel and ultimately NYC.

I will discuss my use of sketchbooks throughout this timeline, the notes I took along the way, goals I made and site serendipitous examples of goals I wrote in my sketchbooks that lead me along my career — doors that opened to art residencies, shows, mentors etc. 

 Kristin Texeira (b. 1988) creates abstract works inspired by her interactions with people and place. Her use of color is channeled from her sensitivity to memory. She often creates “memory maps” that retell of a specific moment in time. Texeira graduated from Massachusetts College of Art and Design in 2010. She has exhibited work via Uprise Art at the Affordable Art Fair and Art on Paper in New York City, with Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco, Brilliant Champions in Brooklyn, Kallenback Gallery in Amsterdam, Room68 in Boston as wells as other galleries across the country and abroad. She has been awarded residencies that include the Varda Artist Residency, The Jaunt, The Sam and Adele Golden Foundation Artist Residency, Vermont Studio Center, Alfred and Trafford Klots International Program for Artists, and most recently the Albers’ Foundation Artist Residency. She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

birthday surprise on the seine_oil on paper_2016

The 251st meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Sept. 17, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

Private Landscapes: Hong Kong Cartoonist Chihoi in discussion with Orion Martin and Jason Li.

Since the late 1990s, Chihoi has created an impressive body of work, first in Hong Kong where he was deeply involved in the underground comics scene, and then in Taiwan, where he worked with Son Ni of nos:books to create a series of ingenious, fully unexpected artist books and comics. Chihoi’s work spans the spectrum of indie comics, from independently published graphic novels to a newspaper strip about a father/daughter relationship that was serialized for years in Hong Kong. Through dozens of iterations throughout the years, Chihoi’s work returns time and again to his sly sense of humor and deep connection to the city of Hong Kong.

Following the recent release of a new anthology of his work, Chihoi will discuss his practice with R. Orion Martin and Jason Li of Paradise Systems. 

Chihoi was born in 1977 in old Hong Kong. In 1996, he began releasing his comics, illustration and writing in local press media, and his comics have appear in various international anthologies. His major comic books include Hijacking – Comic Hong Kong Literature (with coauthor Kongkee), The Train (with coauthor Hung Hung), and Still Life. His work has been translated into Italian, French, Finnish and English. 

R. Orion Martin is a translator and publisher based in Brooklyn, New York. Since 2016 he has been running Paradise Systems, an comics press that publishes outstanding work from the United States and China. 

Jason Li is an independent designer, cartoonist and researcher. He is also an editor at Paradise Systems.

Chihoi image

 

The 250th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Sept. 10, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

Yann Kebbi on “What is a good drawing?”

Why “finalize”? To make a drawing look nicer? What’s a good drawing in regard to telling a story?
In a completely un-objective approach we will discuss and look at a few examples of what can be considered skilled and un-skilled drawing — especially in a narrative sequence such as comic books or children books.
Born in Paris in 1987. Illustrator for the press, Yann Kebbi also publishes graphic novels, picture books, does etching, mono-prints and lithography.

KEbbi 72dpi

 

 

The 249th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Sept. 3, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, room UL 105 (lower level). Free and open to the public.

James Romberger’s FOR REAL

James Romberger will discuss For Real #1, his new comic book from Uncivilized Books which contains “The Oven,” a short story that melds two battles fought in different eras by the great cartoonist Jack Kirby and touches on themes of PTSD, graphic medicine, courage and empathy; and “The Real Thing,” an accompanying essay by James that elaborates on those issues in relation to Kirby’s biography.

Jack Kirby was the most prolific American comic book creator of the 20th century. He produced Captain America and countless other iconic heroes in the “Golden Age of Comics” in the 1940s and 1950s and with his partner Joe Simon, initiated romance comics; he generated the concepts and characters of Marvel Comics for editor/copywriter Stan Lee in the 1960s; and he was the auteur of his masterpiece, the multi-title “4th World” New Gods series for DC Comics in the 1970s. In the 1980s he initiated comics’ “direct market” system with his independent title Captain Victory. The top-grossing blockbuster films of today are largely inspired by his efforts. But he is also known for making personal statements in the latter part of his long career, making comics that reflect his experiences growing up in the impoverished Lower East Side of NYC and as a footsoldier in WW2.

“The Oven” is a fictionalized amalgam of two little-discussed and largely undocumented parts of Kirby’s life, a harrowing encounter with Nazis and his treatment for cancer; but this is not meant to only appeal to Kirby’s fans; rather, it resonates with many areas of current and relevant interest to readers, critics and scholars of the comics art form. The accompanying essay clarifies aspects of the story and contextualizes them with the reality of Kirby’s experiences. The title For Real is the first issue of what will be a continuing anthology title, to be edited by Romberger and published regularly by Uncivilized Books.

uncivilizedbooks.com

James Romberger’s pastel drawings are in many private and public collections including those of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harvard Business School and the Library of Congress. He was the co-director with Marguerite Van Cook of the seminal 1980s East Village installation gallery Ground Zero. He is the Eisner-nominated cartoonist of Post York and co-author of the graphic novels 7 Miles a Second, The Late Child and Other Animals, Bronx Kill and Aaron and Ahmed. He has written about comics, film and art for Publisher’s WeeklyComics JournalThe Beat, LAABStudy Group Magazine and Hooded Utilitarian. His most recent book is the critical study Steranko: The Self-Created Man. He teaches art at Parsons and Marywood University. 

Whole cover final

The 248th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  August 27, 2019 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, Kellen Auditorium, room N101 (first floor) at 66 Fifth Avenue. Free and open to the public.

Julie Doucet’s Murderous Home Goods: Anne Elizabeth Moore discusses the work of Julie Doucet

Long considered one of the most influential women in American independent comics—although she left the field, and is Canadian—Julie Doucet finally receives a full-length critical overview of her work, from Anne Elizabeth Moore, a noted chronicler of independent media and critical gender theorist. Sweet Little Cunt is the first book-length critical analysis of a female cartoonist by a female theorist in the English language. It is a landmark production, both in Moore’s unique and defiant analysis of Doucet’s work, and the significance of a woman reorienting the entire dialogue around Doucet and comics in general, in a field that has been so thoroughly and toxically dominated by men. This book is part of Uncivilized Books’ Critical Cartoons series, where artists, writers, and theorists critically reflect on the work of seminal cartoonists and graphic novelists. Moore’s writing is full of sharp wit and nuanced observation, extensive research, and a deep respect for her subject’s revolutionary work,  which ultimately creates a truer profile of Doucet than anything that has preceded it.

Anne Elizabeth Moore is an award-winning journalist, best-selling comics anthologist, and internationally lauded cultural critic. Called “one of the sharpest thinkers and cultural critics bouncing around the globe today” by Razorcake, a ‘general phenom’ by the Chicago Reader and by the New York Times, and “rad writer” by Time Out New York-Kids. Her book Unmarketable was named Best Book of 2007 by Mother Jones. Body Horror is on the Nonfiction Shortlist for the 2017 Chicago Review of Books Nonfiction Award and was named a Best Book of 2017 by the Chicago Public Library. She was awarded a fellowship in Detroit’s unique Write A House program. She resides there with her cat.

doucet cover 72dpi.jpg