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The 174th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  January 24, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Orion Martin on The Largest Comics Industry Ever: China’s Pulp Comics

Beginning in Shanghai in the 1920s, a vibrant culture of mass produced comics developed in mainland China. These pocket-sized comics, called lianhuanhua, became one of the most popular forms of entertainment in the country and were printed in tremendous quantities. In 1985, the peak year of lianhuanhua production, more than eight billion comics were printed in genres ranging from historical parables to adaptations of Star Wars. Demand for the comics has decreased since the 1980s, but hundreds of thousands continue to circulate in antique stores and online.

R. Orion Martin is writer and translator based in Brooklyn, New York. He writes about comics, art, and the ways new understandings of comics can make them more meaningful to our lives. His work has been featured on Hyperallergic, The Comics Journal, and The Hooded Utilitarian. You can find him on Tumblr or Twitter.

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The 173rd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Dec. 13, 2016 at 7pm at Parsons The New School for Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Michael Tisserand on ” Birth of the Krazy: The Early Days of George Herriman and Krazy Kat.”

George Herriman’s biographer Michael Tisserand revisits the years when boxing, funny animals, and the one cartoonist’s genius produced comics’ most enigmatic character.

Michael Tisserand‘s biography of George Herriman, Krazy: George Herriman, a Life in Black and White will be published by HarperCollins in December, 2016. His previous books include The Kingdom of Zydeco and the Hurricane Katrina memoir Sugarcane Academy. He lives in New Orleans.

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The 172nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Dec. 6, 2016 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Cynthia Roman on “Hogarthian Progresses in Eighteenth-Century Graphic Satire”
 
Sequential narration in satiric prints is most famously associated with the “modern moral subjects” of William Hogarth (1697–1764): Harlot’s Progress (1732), A Rake’s Progress (1735), Marriage A-la-Mode (1745), and Industry and Idleness (1747) among others. Less well-known is the broad spectrum of legacy “progresses” produced by subsequent generations drawing both on Hogarth’s narrative strategies and his iconic motifs. James Gillray (1756–1815), celebrated for his innovative single-plate satires, was among the most accomplished printmakers to adopt Hogarthian sequential narration even as he transformed it according to his unique vision. Gillray’s forays into Hogarthian progresses kept the idiom relevant for further development by later graphic satirists including G.M. Woodward, Richard Newton, Charles Williams, Williams Elmes and George Cruikshank whose works will also be considered in this talk.
Cynthia Roman is Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University. She is editor and contributor to Hogarth’s Legacy distributed by Yale University Press, 2016.

James Gillray, John Bull's Progress small
image: James Gillray, John Bull’s Progress, 1793. The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

The 171st meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Nov. 29, 2016 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Two talks by Warren Bernard:
1.Training The Armed Forces: The Work of Lt.  Robert Osborn and Sgt. Will Eisner

Some of the first large scale institutional training utilizing comics was by the Army and Navy in WW2. Lt Robert Osborn for the Navy and Sgt. Will Eisner for the Army created materials used to teach pilots, mechanics and front line troops how to properly use and care for their equipment. Both of them used their work on training materials during the war to refine their craft that was integrated into their post-war work.

2. Before Pearl Harbor: Cartoons and Comics Respond to The War In Europe

This lecture focuses on how cartoons and comics reacted to global events during the run-up up to the opening of World War Two, as well as the two years of the war that the United States was a neutral power, prior to the bombing of Pearl Harbor in December 1941.  We will look at the movement  of the response to these events from the world of political cartoon on the editorial page to the pop culture worlds of comic books and comic strips, by looking at works by Milton Caniff, Milt Gross, Peter Arno, William Gropper, Herblock, Alex Raymond, Joe Shuster, Alex Schomberg, Winsor McCay, David Low, Jack Kirby and many others.

Warren Bernard is a comics historian as well as the Executive Director of Small Press Expo. Warren has written for The Comics Journal on the influential cartoonist John T. McCutcheon, as well as an extensive article with newly uncovered information about the Senate Comic Book Hearings. Last year Warren co-curated, with Bill Kartalopoulos, the successful and critically well-received retrospective on Alt-Weekly Comics at the Society of Illustrators. He has contributed research and images from his own extensive collection to over a dozen books on comics history. Warren has lectured on comics history at the The Center for Cartoon Studies and the Library of Congress, where as a long-time volunteer, he has cataloged over 1300 political cartoons. He recently released his first solo book, Cartoons for Victory from Fantagraphics, which is the story of the home front in the United States during World War II as told through comics and cartoons. His first book, Drawing Power, the story of cartoonists work in the advertising field, was co-written with Rick Marschall and nominated for an Eisner Award.
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images: (top to bottom) Robert Osborn, Will Eisner (Image Courtesy Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, poster by Corporal Will Eisner, United States Army.), and Winsor McCay.

The next meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be on Nov. 29th. at 7pm.

Warren Bernard will present two talks: 1. Training The Armed Forces: The Work of Lt. Robert Osborn and Sgt. Will Eisner, and 2. Before Pearl Harbor: Cartoons and Comics Respond to The War in Europe.

The 170th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Nov. 15, 2016 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Angela Stempel on Picturing Worlds: abstraction, rhythm and “reality” in animated spaces.

In this presentation, Angela will present her works of experimental animation that explore abstract shapes, the dissolution of the physical form and of photographic certainty in narrative and non-narrative pieces. She’ll discuss her influences, contemporary work and how she deals with the representation of time and energy.

Angela Stempel is an animator, illustrator and director from Caracas, Venezuela. She’s been living and working in the US since 2006, when she attended the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Her personal work has screened at the Ottawa International Animation Festival (Canada), at the International Film Festival of Cartagena (Colombia), and in various other festivals around the world. She is currently pursuing her MFA in Experimental Animation at CalArts.

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The next meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be on Nov. 15th. at 7pm.

Angela Stempel will present her works of experimental animation.