The seventy-sixth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Jennifer George and Charles Kochman on The Art of Rube Goldberg. Not many of us make it into the dictionary as an adjective. But then again, Rube Goldberg was no ordinary noun. He was a cartoonist, humorist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor, and in a 72-year career he wrote and illustrated nearly 50,000 cartoons which were syndicated in daily newspapers throughout the world. In The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts) author Jennifer George celebrates all aspects of her grandfather’s life by showcasing more than seven hundred illustrations, alongside an introduction by bestselling author Adam Gopnik and other essayists, providing a definitive look at this quintessential American cartoonist.

Jennifer George is the granddaughter of Rube Goldberg. She is a writer and a jewelry and clothing designer. For almost twenty years her label was carried at Bergdorf Goodman, Barney’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdales, and dozens of other specialty stores across the U.S. She lives in New York City.

Charles Kochman is the editorial director of Abrams ComicArts, and editor of the #1 bestselling series Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney. Kochman has edited several hundred books for all age groups. Prior to Abrams, Kochman was the first editor of licensed publishing at DC Comics and MAD magazine.
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The seventy-fifth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Mark Alan Stamaty on his life, his work and other metaphysical questions.

Mark Alan Stamaty was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He grew up in a New Jersey beach town, the only child of two professional cartoonists. He attended Cooper Union where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1969.
Mark is the author-illustrator of ten books. His children’s books include Who Needs Donuts? (1973, 2003), Alia’s Mission (2005), Too Many Time Machines (1999), Small in the Saddle (1975), Minnie Maloney & Macaroni (1976), and Where’s My Hippopotamus?(1977).
In 1977–1978, Mark’s panoramic centerfold cartoons of Greenwich Village and Times Square for the Village Voice attracted widespread attention and were sold by the Village Voice as posters. He then created a series of comic strips for that paper, including MacDoodle St., which was later published as a comic strip novel.
In 1981 Meg Greenfield, editorial page editor of the Washington Post, asked Mark to create a comic strip about Washington for her op-ed page. Mark traveled to D.C. to do extensive research, and in November of that year the Post and the Village Voice jointly debuted his new creation, Washingtoon, featuring, among many other characters, Congressman Bob Forehead, chairman of the JFK-Look-Alike Caucus. The comic strip’s popularity with Post and Voice readers led to its being picked up by more than 40 newspapers, including the Boston Globe, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Austin-American Statesman.
From 1994 to 1996, Mark was the political cartoonist for Time Magazine. From 2001 to 2003, he produced the monthly comic strip Boox for the New York Times Book Review. His cartoon reporting has covered a variety of events for GQMagazine and The New Yorker, including men’s fashion shows in Milan, the 2001 Baseball All-Star Game, the Washington Redskins’ training camp, the Madison Square Garden 1992 25th-Anniversary Concert honoring Bob Dylan, the buzz around Washington during President Clinton’s grand jury testimony, a UFO convention, and many more.
Mark has created covers for The New Yorker, the New Republic, the Washington Post Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, and others. His cartoons and illustrations have appeared in many publications, including Slate Magazine, Esquire, New York Magazine, Harper’s, Newsweek, Playboy, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times Magazine.
Mark’ was the recipient of two Gold Medals and a Silver Medal from the Society of Illustrators, the Premio “Satira Politica” Forte Dei Marmi 2005 from the Museum of Satire in Forte Dei Marmi, Italy, and a Page One Award from the Newspaper Guild of New York. His illustrations have been selected for the Communication Arts Annual and the American Illustration Annual.
In 2005, Mark produced a series of full-color comic strips and  commentary on the Los Angeles mayoral campaign for the Los Angeles Times. In 2007, Mark received the Augustus Saint Gaudens Award for Career Achievement in Art from Cooper Union. Presently, his work includes fulfilling a two-book contract with Knopf Children’s Books and a variety of free-lance assignments.

stamaty detailMark Alan Stamaty, A Cartoon Legacy (detail), from The New Yorker, 2011

The seventy-fourth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, Kellen auditorium, 66 Fifth Ave. Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentations by Conor Stechschulte and Christopher Adams.

Conor Stechschulte on To and From The Amateurs: A comprehensive look at the ideas and influences that lead to the making of The Amateurs, the lessons learned while making it, and how I’ve applied those lessons to my current comics work. Other topics that may or may not be glancingly addressed: accidental dismemberment, the true sound a screaming pig makes, drawing comics while standing up, and what affineurs and cartoonists have in common. Conor Stechschulte began self-publishing comics in 2005 as a member of the Closed Caption Comics collective in Baltimore. Since then he has made more than a dozen acclaimed hand-made books. His work has appeared in Happiness!, Smoke Signal, and Sundays, on the notable list for both Best American Comics and Best American Non-Required Reading, and in national and international art exhibitions. A reprint of his graphic novel, The Amateurs is forthcoming from Fantagraphics in 2014.

Christopher Adams will talk about his work and some of the work that appeals to him and the direct and indirect connections between the two. Specifically he will talk about the non-comics work that appeals to him. Specifically work that is somewhat brief, dry, technical and descriptive. Work that brings to mind instruction manuals or user guides. Work from different fields. He will also talk about how he likes to think about looking in relation to this work and how that informs what he would like to draw and paint and write. And ultimately how he would like to proceed making comics that are maybe not comics. Christopher Adams is an artist and musician who lives and works in Baltimore. He has made three comic books: Period, Strong Eye Contact and Yule Log – all published by 2D Cloud. He has made two music albums: Baby Hair and Vegetables. He also sells art supplies.

Stechschulte imageConor Stechschulte

chrisadams imageChristopher Adams

The seventy-third meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Keren Katz will discuss and show work from the small history of cartooning in Israel as represented in three recently published catalogs by The Israeli Museum of Caricature and Comics. She will sample artwork from these catalogs, representing three time periods, focusing on work by contemporary Israeli cartoonists. She will also share slides from her thesis work and her documentation of guerrilla poetry readings at the MoMA.
Keren Katz is an Israeli illustrator and cartoonist based in New York. A graduate of the Illustration as Visual Essay MFA program, School of Visual Arts (New York) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Jersusalem), she has contributed comics to anthologies worldwide, self published six graphic novels and many zines. Titles include: Crossing the Rubikon, Chronicles of the Falling Women, Before The Dark Gate, Rashomon Ramat-Gan, Joseph and his Amazing Technicolor Coat Check Dream, Were You Watching?, The Night Poetry Class in Room 1001, and Uncontested Spaces which will be published by No Press. For more of her work visit: http://kerenkatz.carbonmade.com/

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The seventy-second meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Jonathan Barli on The Mad World of Virgil Partch. An in-depth look at the life and art of one of the most influential and trendsetting cartoonists of his generation. The talk will be illustrated by scores of unseen photographs and artwork, cover Partch’s life and times and how they influenced his artistic sensibilities, and include a thorough analysis of his cartooning and the context in which his work appeared. From a remote island off the coast of Alaska and a stint as an animator at Disney Studios during its golden age, Partch burst onto the scene with his zany, sometimes surreal, but always hilarious cartoons, catapulting his career virtually overnight. An artist truly ahead of his time, his unique perspective and style ensured he would become one of the most prolific cartoonists of his era, and solidified his role in inspiring generations of cartoonists, animators, and illustrators.

Jonathan Barli is a designer, writer, and filmmaker. He was educated at the School of Visual Arts and soon after graduating, co-founded Rosebud Archives: a company dedicated to preserving and celebrating the cultural heritage of the graphic arts, where he serves as Art Director. He recently wrote, edited, and designed a book on the renowned cartoonist Virgil Partch. He has done design work for Fantagraphics Books, the Theodore Roosevelt Association, Ron Garofalo Photography and others.

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The seventy-first meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Misha Beletsky on Visual Storytelling in Early 20th c. Russian Illustrated Book
Early Soviet books were created in a period of complete devastation of the printing trade, and an astonishing outburst of creativity that made up for all technical deficiencies. These talks will examine new ways words and images came together to tell a story in illustrated books for children and adults of the period.

Misha 1 Part One: Legacy of the Avant-Garde: Word Play and Picture Play
The art of children’s books flourished in the first two decades after the 1917 Revolution. The medium attracted some of the most important artists of this period (including Lissitsky, Lebedev, and Tatlin) and authors (including Mayakovsky, Marshak, and the OBERIU group). Rapidly, the language of the fringe Avant-Garde movements displaced the mainstream of Russian art. Illustrated books, like other media, were thoroughly reinvented. For a limited time, until the onset of the officially-mandated Socialist Realist esthetic in the mid-30s, unbridled experimentation in visual storytelling was equated with political progress and promoted by the new regime. We will focus on the artists and the movements that defined this era.
Misha 2Part Two: The Space of Time: Moscow School of Wood Engraving
Scarcity of photoengraving materials, combined with dismal printing quality in the post-Civil-War Moscow brought about a resurgence of handmade line cuts, or wood engravings. Formerly utilized mainly to reproduce pen-and-ink drawings, the technique came into its own as a group of talented Moscow artists including Favorsky, Piskarev, and Goncharov adopted it as their medium of choice. Eschewing complete rejection of tradition by their Constructivist colleagues, these artists carefully studied world heritage of printmaking retaining those elements they felt relevant to the modern experience and letting go of the others. They felt equally comfortable with elements of contemporary Avant-Garde idiom and occasionally utilized them in their work. Of particular interest to us are the concepts of time and space, as interpreted in single-panel compositions by Vladimir Favorsky and his followers.
Misha Beletsky is a graphic designer and design historian. He is the author of Book Covers by Ismar David. Misha has been the art director of Abbeville Press, a publisher of fine illustrated books in New York for over a decade.

The seventieth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, December 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Bob Sikoryak on the history of adapting literature into comics. “Throughout the last century, many cartoonists have adapted classic novels and plays; I’ll discuss the history of these reinterpretations, with images from over 100 years of comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. They are by turns respectful, hilarious, and revelatory. Perhaps the most famous attempts were made in the 1940′s Classics Illustrated series, but there have been many inventive and exhilarating comics adaptations published, from the “Minute Movies” comic strip of the 1910′s to the many ambitious books of today.” — Bob Sikoryak

R. Sikoryak is the author of Masterpiece Comics (Drawn & Quarterly). He’s drawn for The Onion, The New Yorker, GQ, MAD, SpongeBob Comics, and Nickelodeon Magazine, among many other publications, as well as the TV series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.  He’s done storyboards and design work for Augenblick Studios on their animated projects Ugly Americans, the SNL Midnight Snack shorts, and the upcoming Zoolander. He teaches in the Parsons Illustration Department and at the Center for Cartoon Studies, and he hosts the live cartoon slide show series Carousel.

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