The 182nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  March 28, 2017 at 8 pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 8 pm starting time!

Jules Feiffer Honors Will Eisner at 100.
A Will Eisner Week Event.
[Jules Feiffer will appear live via Skype.]

Will Eisner (1917-2005) innovated and pioneered comics in two different eras. Eisner helped invent the comics industry in the 1930s and created The Spirit in the 1940s as a heroic crime-fighting figure who appeared in a Sunday newspaper comics insert. The Spirit walked through a world of noir-inflected, urban drama, one suffused with humor and insight into the human condition, a world not afraid to essay the occasional Yiddish in-joke or Bronx social drama vignette.  Then after producing comics for training and education, Eisner, in 1978, re-invented himself―and the medium of comics―with his first graphic novel, A Contract With God, followed, until his 2005 passing, with many additional graphic novels and textbooks.
From 1946 until The Spirit’s end in 1952, Eisner counted as part of his close-knit, talented staff, a precocious teenager named Jules Feiffer, who worked on The Spirit and Clifford for Eisner, and also took on the self-appointed role of Eisner’s social conscience and resident smart-ass. In the years since, Feiffer’s own multifaceted career as satirical cartoonist, screenwriter (Carnal Knowledge), playwright (Little Murders) and children’s book author (The Man in the Ceiling)―and most recently, creator of his own trilogy of graphic novels (so far Kill My Mother and Cousin Joseph have been released, with the third volume in the works)―has blossomed in a unique and spectacular manner. But he did get his start with Will Eisner, with whom he was friend and colleague―and admirer―through the rest of Eisner’s life.
Tonight, Jules will speak about his experience working for Eisner, what he learned from him and how Eisner influenced his own work, and why Eisner, a century after his birth, is still an important figure in the past, present and future of comics and graphic novels and in our culture as a whole.
Jules will speak and present via Skype, and will be joined by in-person panelists, including Paul Levitz (author of Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel) and Danny Fingeroth (co-editor of The Stan Lee Universe and Chair of Will Eisner Week).

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CANCELED DUE TO STORM. The 181st meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  March 14, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Jonathan H. Grossman and Ellen Truxaw on A Duo of Nineteenth-Century Digital Art Projects: The Crowd-Pleasing Cover Art of Railway Novels & George Cruikshank’s Eye. Come see some stunning nineteenth-century visual images and witness their re-birth in the digital age! The topic will be two new digital projects: one on the crowd-pleasing cover art of railway novels and the other, in progress, on presenting an archive, held by the Hammer museum, of George Cruikshank’s caricatures and prints.

Jonathan H. Grossman is Professor of English at UCLA. He works on nineteenth-century British literature.
Ellen Truxaw, PhD candidate in English at UCLA, is writing a dissertation about the relation between image and text in the nineteenth century.

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Collins, Wilkie, 1824-1889, Basil: A Story of Modern Life, Publisher: J. Blackwood,  1856

The 180th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  March 7, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Tiger Moody on Shooting Dope, Noosing Rope, and Other Things the Funnies Learnt Me:
The harrowing true saga of one young delinquent’s quest for salvation within a box of lurid mildew.

Tiger Moody is the author of the novels Induction of the Sycophant, Heart of Brass, and the forthcoming Scabs. His cartoons, complaints, and short-fiction have appeared in The Buyer’s Guide to Comics Fandom, Dear Jesus, Paper Magazine, and Facebook, amongst others. He is a poet in-residence at Ray’s Candy Store, and a frequent contributor to the bathroom-walls of the Lower East Side.

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The 179th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Feb. 28, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Mort Gerberg on The Magazine Cartoon: Telling a Story in Only One Panel
The magazine cartoon is said to be the most challenging to create of all the cartoon forms, because it must communicate a complete narrative in the space of only a single, motionless frame, in about four seconds – contrasted with multi-panel pages, comic strips, animations and graphic novels.
A cartoon is instant visual/verbal communication of a funny idea, designed so that a reader gets its message in a glance – during the flip of a page.
A cartoon is a split second in time – the one precise moment during some continuous action that not only perfectly describes that action, but also tells what immediately preceded it, and perhaps implies what will happen next.
To be successful, this split second must be the correct freeze frame chosen from the imagined movie, that tells the whole story.  The drawing itself does not move, but it is not a still life.
In creating a single panel cartoon, the challenge is not only to envision the correct moment, but to reproduce it so that readers can see it, too.  To do this, the cartoonist employs a number of elements commonly associated with art and drama.  These include, among others, cast, dialogue, gesture, setting, composition, and clichés.
In my presentation, I’ll show examples of my own and others’ cartoons, chosen from two familiar subjects.  Many of my points of discussion are those I used in the classes I taught at Parsons, “Cartooning For Communication,” which I later used in writing my book, “Cartooning: the Art and the Business.” – Mort Gerberg

Mort Gerberg is a longtime multi-genre cartoonist and author best known for his magazine cartoons in The New Yorker, Playboy and numerous other publications.  He was voted as Best Magazine Cartoonist of 2007 and 2008 by the NCS, and was a six-time finalist in other years in other categories.  He was also a founding member and president of The Cartoonists Guild.
Gerberg has drawn several nationally-syndicated newspaper comic strips and has written, edited and/or illustrated 43 books for adults and children, including Cartooning: The Art and the Business, which has been the most respected instructional/reference work in the field for over 30 years.
He also has written and drawn for television, online and home video and he taught cartooning for 15 years at New York City’s Parsons School of Design.
For clients in the business world he creates customized art and humorous writing for their advertising and public relations, and is a creative consultant for ideation focus groups.
Gerberg is also a popular public speaker, particularly on the subjects of creativity and positive aging.

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The 178th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Feb. 21, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Daniel Savage on  Rhythm and animation
Exploring rhythm in everyday life and finding obscure inspiration for animated films.

Daniel Savage is an independent designer and animation director based in Brooklyn, NY. He has created projects such as Yule Log 2.0 and mixed.parts. His work has been recognized by Wired Magazine, The Webbys, and One Show to name a few. In 2012 he was named a Young Gun by the Art Directors Club. He has taught design and animation at SVA, NYU, and guest lectured at a wide variety of schools and events.

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The 177th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Feb. 14, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Zoe Beloff on
A World Redrawn: Eisenstein and Brecht in Hollywood
Zoe Beloff will discuss her exhibition and book A World Redrawn inspired by unrealized film scenarios by the Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and the German playwright Bertolt Brecht.  Through films, drawings, architectural models and archival documents, she re-imagines their ideas for today.

Zoe Beloff is an artist working in film, installation and drawing. Her work focuses on drawing new time lines between past and present to help us think against the grain of reactionary ideology. Her projects include The Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society and its Circle 1926-1972, The Days of the Commune and most recently A World Redrawn: Eisenstein and Brecht in Hollywood. She is currently producing an exhibition “Emotions go to Work” about the commodification of affect and the Internet of Things. Zoe’s has been featured in international exhibitions and screenings. Venues include The Whitney Museum, Site Santa Fe, the M HKA museum in Antwerp, the Pompidou Center in Paris and Freud’s Dream Museum in St Petersburg.  She is a Professor at Queens College CUNY.
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Still from the film “A Model Family in a Model Home”

The 176th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday,  Feb. 7, 2017 at 7pm at Parsons School of Design, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Roman Muradov on How I Didn’t Write Certain of My Books
To hell with narrative and self-expression! Instead: constraints and repetition (and repetition)! This talk sets Idleness against Inspiration, and namedrops an indecent number of French names in the process. Reader, attend!!

Roman Muradov is an award-winning illustrator and the author of (In A Sense) Lost & Found, Jacob Bladders and the State of the Art and the End of A Fence, as well as a French collection Aujourd’hui Demain Hier. He has a Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators, a habit of long aimless walks, and an imaginary dog named Barchibald.

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