104nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, October 21, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).  Gary Panter attempts to invoke the unfolding lotus of the 1960s by thumbing through an old magazine missing pages – LOOK, Jan 9, 1968. Gary Panter is an illustrator, painter, designer and part-time musician. Panter’s work is representative of the post-underground, new wave comics movement that began with the end of Arcade: The Comics Revue and the initiation of RAW, one of the second generation in American underground comix. He’s had three one-man shows at Fredericks & Freiser gallery in  New York City. In 2008, Gary was the subject of a one-man show at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. His books include a comprehensive monograph, Gary Panter (PictureBox), and four graphic novels: Jimbo in Purgatory (Fantagraphics); Jimbo’s Inferno (Fantagraphics); Cola Madnes (Funny Garbage); Jimbo: Adventures in Paradise (Pantheon). Gary has won numerous awards, including three Emmy Awards for his production design on Pee-wee’s Playhouse, as well as the 2000 Chrysler Award for Design Excellence. For more information visit: http://www.garypanter.com/site/

103nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).  Presentation: Anya Ulinich in conversation with Olga Gershenson. Anya Ulinich will present her graphic novel, Lena Finkle’s Magic Barrel, which the Publishers’ Weekly called “an honest and absorbing tragicomedy about love, sex, and everything that goes with them.” She will discuss how she went from being a painter to becoming a fiction writer to writing a graphic novel, and the steep learning curves along the way. She will also talk about her process, and the challenges of using autobiographical material in fiction and visual storytelling. Anya Ulinich grew up in Moscow, Russia, and immigrated to Arizona when she was seventeen. She holds an MFA in visual arts from the University of California, Davis. She is the author of Petropolis (Viking, 2007), and Lena Finkle’s Magic Barrel, a graphic novel (Penguin, 2014). Ulinich’s short stories and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Zoetrope: All-Story, n+1, and PEN America Journal. She teaches creative writing at the New School and lives in Brooklyn with her two daughters. Olga Gershenson has been Jewish in Russia, Russian in Israel, and finally became an academic in the US, where she is Professor of Judaic and Near Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is the author of Gesher: Russian Theatre in Israel (2005) and The Phantom Holocaust: Soviet Cinema and Jewish Catastrophe (2013), as well as an editor of Ladies and Gents: Public Toilets and Gender (2009). She has published widely on Jewish and Israeli films, and she is now working on her own film.

102nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, October 7, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation: Jay A. Gertzman: Look, Look, Just Look: Scopophilia and the 20th century Illustrated Book. My talk  will be about the way 20th century drawings illustrate texts by substituting the mutual sexual  contact and its fulfillment—which is the subject of the narrative—with images which stimulate auto erotic responses in the viewer. Freud’s phrase for this is scopophilia, the substitution of the eye for the penis. What results is prurience and the substitution of shame for pleasure in establishing a loving relationship.
After a few book illustrations exemplary of gazing and fantasizing,  I will show three types of graphic illustrations. The first are drawings prepared for wealthy consumers: erotic bookplates, extra-illustrated images in finely printed editions of classic pornography, and a deluxe privately printed 1930s edition of Lady Chatterley’s Lover.
The next class of drawings was used to sell prurient but not explicit materials that could be used to interest, but not shock, middle- and working-class consumers with conventional sexual tolerances, given the moral  consensus of their communities. Illustrations for mail order fiction, non-fiction, and correspondence clubs, as well as pulp magazines and paperback novels, are rich sources for judging what these purveyors of  borderline  material wanted to tease their customers with.  Many of these also show men looking at females—the keyhole motif was famous for its frequent appearance in advertisements as well as books themselves.
A final set of slides would illustrate materials sold to, or created by, underclass and outcast people.  These are for the most part explicit (regarding various sexual acts and full nudity) and at the same time more expressive of unruly desires than they are prurient teases: playing cards, tattoos, Tijuana Bibles (“little dirty comics”),  sketches on boarded-up windows of Times Square bookstores and peep palaces,  graffiti, and  covers and interior drawings for hard core paperbacks.
In all three categories, there are drawings which subvert the concept of prurience and the identification of sex with furtive masturbatory pleasure. Jay A Gertzman retired in 2000 as a professor of English at Mansfield U. He taught a diverse set of courses: radical themes in modern literature, noir crime fiction, D H Lawrence, Shakespeare, literary censorship, in addition to composition at the freshman and upper class levels. His research specialty is publishing history. He has published four books on this subject.
In Bookleggers and Smuthounds: The Distribution and Prosecution of Erotica, 1920-1940 (U of Pennsylvania Press, 1999), he discussed publishers, distributors and dealers and their symbiotic relationship with private “decency” groups and police.  The book details  the methods of underground publishing and the way booksellers got sexually explicit texts into readers’ hands. His Samuel Roth, Infamous Modernist, was published in the spring of 2014 by the U. Press of Florida. It is a biography of the man who served two federal prison terms for distributing erotica through underground sources and the U.S. mails.  After publishing parts of Ulysses in 1926 without explicit permission from James Joyce, he was denounced as a “thief” and “pirate,” although there was no international copyright agreement at the time.  Roth’s long career as editor, poet, and iconoclast  culminated in Roth v. U.S. (1957), a major event in First amendment liberalization.

101st meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, September 30, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation: World War 3 Illustrated 1979-2014. Celebrating the release of a new 320 page hard-cover anthology, artist/editors Peter Kuper, Seth Tobocman, Sabrina Jones and Sandy Jimenez will give you a behind the scenes history of the of the long-running zine’s past, present and future with visual presentations. Peter Kuper is co-founder of World War 3 illustrated and has written and drawn “Spy vs Spy” for Mad magazine since 1997.  His graphic novels include The System, Sticks and Stones, and Stop Forgetting to Remember, and he has also published the sketchbook diaries Diario de Oaxaca and Drawn to New York, as well as graphic adaptations of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle and Kafka’s The Metamorphosis.  His cartoons have appeared in The New York Times, Time, and Newsweek. He teaches comics courses at The School of Visual Arts and Harvard University. Seth Tobocman, co- founded the magazine World War 3 Illustrated.  He is the author of a number of graphic books including: You Don’t Have to Fuck People over To Survive, War in the Neighborhood, Disasters and Resistance and Understanding the Crash. His illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, The Village Voice and many other publications. His art has been displayed at The Museum of Modern Art, The New Museum Of Contemporary Art among many other museums and galleries. His images have been used as posters, banners, murals, patches and tattoos by people’s movements all over the world. Sabrina Jones created her first comics for World War 3 Illustrated and went on to edit many issues. Her graphic biographies have covered historical visionaries from Isadora Duncan and Walt Whitman to FDR and Jesus. She has illuminated the work of justice advocates in “The Real Cost of Prisons Comix” and “Race to Incarcerate, A Graphic Retelling.” Sandy Jimenez is a comic book artist and filmmaker who has produced scores of varied and original illustrated stories since graduating from The Cooper Union in 1990, he is best known for creating the independent comic book series Marley Davidson, and the long running and critically acclaimed “Shit House Poet” stories for World War 3 Illustrated. His next work, an illustrated adaptation of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea will appear in the upcoming Graphic Canon YA collection for Seven Stories Press.
100th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, September 23, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentations: Michael DeForge, Simon Hanselmann & Patrick Kyle. Michael DeForge goes through different finished and unfinished projects he’s thrown away before publication. He discusses the value of abandoning projects, scripted versus improvised storytelling and the importance of digressions in the writing process. Michael DeForge was born in 1987 and grew up in Ottawa, Ontario. He moved to Toronto for school in the mid 2000s where he became an integral part of the local comics scene. His debut work, Lose #1, was published in 2009 and was quickly followed by a catalog of minis, zines, short stories in anthology collections, and four more issues of Lose.  In 2010 DeForge won for “Best Emerging Talent” at the Doug Wright Awards, and in 2011 he won the award for non-narrative and nominally-narative work for his Spotting Dear. In 2013 Koyama Press published DeForge’s book collection of work entitled Very Casual. Simon Hanselmann will discuss the Australian comics scene, the virtues of Tumblr as a distribution platform, making money, ‘the future’ and his general comics making process. Also: various crackpot theories and obscure in-jokes. Simon Hanselmann is a Tasmanian born cartoonist best known for his Megg, Mogg and Owl series. In July 2013  Fantagraphics Books published his  200-page collection of strips Megahex. In August 2013, Simon Hanselmann was nominated for an Ignatz award for his comic St.Owl’s Bay. He lives in Melbourne, Australia. Having self-published comics for the better part of the last decade, Patrick Kyle will discuss the logistics of playing publisher while balancing careers as both a cartoonist and illustrator. Patrick Kyle lives and works in Toronto, Canada. He is the co-founder and editor of Wowee Zonk, a contemporary comic book anthology featuring upcoming narrative artists from Toronto. He has been previously nominated for Doug Wright and Ignatz awards for his comic book series Black Mass and Distance Mover. Patrick’s illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, Esquire, The Walrus, Transworld Skateboarding Magazine, and Vice Magazine.

 

99th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, September 16, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentations: Yvan Alagbé and Dominique Goblet. Yvan Alagbé and Dominique Goblet will discuss their careers and their most recent work in a conversation moderated by Bill Kartalopoulos (Series Editor, The Best American Comics).
Yvan Alagbé (France) and Dominique Goblet (Belgium) are key and influential figures in the development of contemporary Francophone comics. Alagbé co-founded the French publishing house Éditions Amok, and Goblet was an early contributor to Frigorevue, the flagship anthology of the Brussels-based publisher Fréon. The two publishers later merged to form Frémok, which continues to publish work by both of these artists and to advocate for ever more sophisticated explorations of comics form.
Alagbé’s own work, rendered in ink and wash, expresses in both harsh lines and soft tones his clear-eyed, penetrating narratives of mysterious desire and explosive cultural conflict, evident in his celebrated Nègres jaunes et autres créatures imaginaires and in his most recent book, École de la misère. Goblet has produced a challenging body of work that questions the distinctions between fiction and autobiography, and between narrative comics and poetic image-making. Her latest book, Plus si Entente, was produced collaboratively with German cartoonist Kai Pfeiffer.
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98th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, September 9, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation: Brian Maidment on The Comic Image in the British Marketplace 1820-1850.
Brian Maidment is Professor of the History of Print at Liverpool John Moores University, UK. His most recent book is called Comedy, Caricature and the Social Order 1820-1850 (Manchester University Press 2013).

97th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).  Presentations: Part 1. A Conversation with Thierry Smolderen. To celebrate the publication of the English-language edition of Thierry Smolderen’s new book The Origins of Comics: from William Hogarth to Winsor McCay, (University Press of Mississippi) the author joins us, via Skype, from France for a conversation.
Thierry Smolderen is a comics writer and scholar who teaches at the École européenne supérieure de l’image in Angoulême, France.

Part 2. Comics in the University.
Panelists : Ben Katchor (Parsons), Peter Kuper (SVA and Harvard), Jonathan W. Gray (John Jay College, CUNY), and  Nick Sousanis (Parsons, Teachers College), lead an audience discussion on the teaching of writing/drawing, history and critical study of comics and text-image work in the university.

86th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, May 13, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).  Presentations by Gabrielle Bell and Jonathan W. Gray Gabrielle Bell will discuss her recent work. Gabrielle Bell was born in England and raised in California. Her work has been selected for the 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012 and 2013 Houghton-Mifflin Best American Comics and the Yale Anthology of Graphic Fiction. Her work has also been featured in The Guardian,The Big Issue,Vice Magazine, McSweeney’s, Bookforum, The Believer, and Flare. The title story of Bell’s book, Cecil and Jordan in New York, (2009) has been adapted for the film anthology Tokyo! by Michel Gondry. Her most recent book,The Voyeurs, was released in 2012 by Uncivilized Books. Truth is Fragmentary: Travelogues & Diaries is scheduled to be released in May 2014, also by Uncivilized Books.

Jonathan W. Gray on Machine-Men: Race and Technology in American Superhero Comics.
Jonathan W. Gray will discuss why Black superheroes are so often also cybernetic hybrids, as with characters like the newly relevant Deathlok, Cyborg, Misty Knight and War Machine. Given that people of African descent were often linked to primitivism in the cultural imagination in general and in comic strips and early comic books in particular, do these post-human Black heroes induce us to understand both race and heroism differently? Is the incorporation of technology into the Black body simply a plot device in superhero comics, or is it an innovative way to visually represent the divided and conflicted racial subject? Is post-human the same as post-racial? Jonathan W. Gray, associate professor, John Jay College–CUNY, works on post-WWII American culture, specifically the various ways that the Civil Rights movement continues to shape cultural production. He is the author of Civil Rights in the White Literary Imagination: Innocence by Association (University Press of Mississippi, 2013) and has contributed articles on comics and popular culture to Entertainment Weekly and Salon. He is currently co-editing Feats of Clay: Disability and Graphic Narrative, which applies the insights of disability studies to contemporary graphic narratives.

A special meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Wednesday, May 7, 2014 at 8:00 PM at  The New School,  66 West 12th Street, Room A407.  Presentation: Antonin Baudry on his recent book Weapons of Mass Diplomacy.
Antonin Baudry, author of the award-winning graphic novel Weapons of Mass Diplomacy (illustrated by Christophe Blain), will discuss his bestselling satire of Franco-American relations in the lead up to the Iraq War. Baudry, who is Cultural Counselor at the French Embassy in New York, will discuss the genesis of the book (published in France as Quai D’Orsay), which draws on his experiences an advisor to former French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin. He will talk about the motivations behind his satire of diplomatic life and why he chose to write it in comic book form. Drawing on the political situation that underpins the book, as well as the vibrant French bande dessinée scene, this talk will provide a unique insight into the creative and diplomatic processes, and will interest anyone with a passion for politics, culture, and comedy. Weapons of Mass Diplomacy was recently adapted into an acclaimed movie, directed by Bertrand Tavernier and starring Thierry Lhermitte and Julie Gayet, which will be released in the US in 2014 (as The French Minister). Abel Lanzac is the pseudonym of Antonin Baudry, a French diplomat who is currently the Cultural Counselor of the French Embassy and Permanent Representative of the French Universities in the United States. Previously he was an Advisor for International Economic and Cultural Affairs for former French Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin. Baudry’s career has been a hybrid of diplomatic and cultural enterprises. As Abel Lanzac, Baudry received the prize for best album at the Angoulême International Comics Festival with designer Christophe Blain in February 2013 for their graphic novel Quai d’Orsay (published in English as Weapons of Mass Diplomacy).  The film adaptation of Quai d’Orsay premiered in November 2013 and won the special jury prize for best screenplay at the Saint-Sébastien Film Festival in September 2013. The film was also chosen as a special presentation at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.  It is nominated for a 2014 César award for best adaptation.
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85th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, May 6, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation: Ariela Freedman on Charlotte Salomon. Charlotte Salomon was a young Jewish artist from Berlin who fled Germany after Kristallnacht, and who hid in the South of France. From 1940 to 1942, she created over thirteen hundred small gouaches and sketches that together comprised a fictionalized autobiography. Salomon rejected a number of the gouaches, leaving a narrative sequence of nearly eight hundred paintings, which she left in the keeping of a family friend when she was deported to Auschwitz, where she was murdered. The paintings combine text and image. Early in the sequence, she wrote the textual element of the story on separate, semi-transparent pieces of paper, which she taped as an overlay above the paintings. Later on, she incorporated text into the images themselves. The entire series, including the paintings that Salomon rejected, is one of the most extraordinary and understudied artworks of the century. Salomon’s work is one of a kind; it is hard to imagine how she imagined her work would be seen at all, let alone how it might be adequately reproduced. As Griselda Pollock writes, Life? Or Theatre? is “one of the twentieth century’s most challenging art works…Yet, I, for one, am not sure that I can know fully what I am looking at.” But what if we say we are looking at a comic? Leben? Oder Theater? Ein Singespeil (“Life? Or Theater? A Melodrama”), might be among the most powerful graphic narratives ever drawn and written. But it is almost entirely absent in critical discourse on comics and on graphic narrative. Part of the reason for Salomon’s absence from comics history is that Life? Or Theater? is not a comic, strictly speaking: it was not drawn to be mass-produced, and was created largely in isolation from a comics tradition. Salomon’s work provides valuable precedent for one of the most significant movements in contemporary comics, graphic memoir and testimonial. In her playful, leading, open title as question — “Life? Or Theatre?”—she introduces the tension inherent in staging autobiography. In her concurrent claim to comics and high art, Salomon anticipates the move of contemporary comics back to the gallery wall. Her foregrounding of the personal and domestic against an implicated dark history prefigures the attempts of writers like Spiegelman, Satrapi and Eisenstein to map their own stories. Life? Or Theatre? may not be exactly a comic, but it is instead something richer and stranger: a graphic narrative of an ambition and scale that has not yet been replicated, that in many ways anticipates the conventions and preoccupations of contemporary graphic memoirs. This presentation will use the semiotic vocabulary developed by comics theorists to explore Salomon’s use of word and image, to argue for Salomon’s place in the emergent comics “canon” and her importance as a multidisciplinary artist.
Ariela Freedman is an Associate Professor at the Liberal Arts College, Concordia University, Montreal. She is the author of Death, Men and Modernism (Routledge, 2003) and has a PhD in English Literature from NYU. She has published widely on literary modernism, and in the last few years has begun to publish on comics in The Journal of Modern Literature and Literature Compass and to present in forums including the “Graphic Details Symposium” (New York, 2012) and “Comics and Medicine: Navigating the Margins” (Toronto, 2012). She currently holds a SSHRC Insight Development Grant on “Charlotte Salomon, Comics and the Representation of Pain” (2013-2015) and is actively seeking cartoonists and picture-story artists whose work is influenced by Salomon. Her essays on Salomon are forthcoming in the Graphic Details anthology (2014) and in the journal Criticism (2014).

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84th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation by Zoe Beloff. “I will talk about my thoughts on the concept “picture stories” in terms of drawing and film.  I will discuss how these two mediums of expression form a dialog in my work, showing examples from three recent projects. The first, Adventures of a Dreamer by Albert Grass is a comic book that belongs to the archive of the Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society. The second, “The Days of the Commune” is a project that encompassed drawing, life performance and cinema. Finally I will present fragments of my current work in progress, “The Glass House” a film that speculates on a scenario by Serge Eisenstein which he proposed to Paramount in 1930 and explores his ideas on the interaction of drawing, animation and live action cinema.” Zoe Beloff works with a wide range of media including film, projection performance, installation and drawing. Her artistic practice is driven by historical research. She is interested in the past as ‘potential’, in bringing to life what might have been and what might yet be, creating proposals for the future. Her work has been featured at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Site Santa Fe, the M HKA museum in Antwerp, and the Pompidou Center in Paris. She has been awarded fellowships from Guggenheim Foundation, The Foundation for Contemporary Arts, The Radcliffe Institute at Harvard and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is a Professor in the Departments of Media Studies and Art at Queens College CUNY

83rd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium , Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentations by William Anthony and Jonathan Bass. William Anthony, satirical painter, draftsman and “cult  figure” (NY Times) will discuss his work, his mid-60s book A New Approach to Figure Drawing and the inspiration he found in student’s “mistakes.” William Anthony was born 1934 in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. While majoring in history at Yale University, Anthony attended a few art courses, one of which was taught by Josef Albers.  After graduating Anthony studied art briefly at schools in New York and California.  In 1962 he taught a course in figure drawing at a commercial art school in San Francisco.  From this experience he wrote a book A New Approach to Figure Drawing  (1965, Crown, NY, and 1967, Odhams, London).  The book’s main idea was to show beginners the mistakes they are likely to make.  This was done with humor and exaggeration to get the point across. Then this idiotic looking at how-not-to draw the figure became the basis of Anthony’s style. In New York Anthony’s work may be found in the Met, the Guggenheim, the Whitney, the Morgan and the Modern as well as 25 other museums both in the US and Europe including the Hermitage.  He has been commissioned to do pages for Artforum, Art in America, The Paris Review and by Andy Warhol for his magazine Interview. Books  of Anthony’s satirical drawings include Bible Stories (Jargon, 1978), Bill Anthony’s Greatest Hits (Jargon, 1988) and  War Is Swell (Smart Art Press, 2000).  In 2013 Sam Jedig  wrote a profusely illustrated book Ironic Icons: The Art of William Anthony.  It currently may be seen at the bookstore at MoMA. Anthony is represented by Stalke Gallery, Kirke Sonnerup, Denmark.

Jonathan Bass will focus on experiments in narrative structure and genre in short comics. Examples will include early newspaper comics by R.F. Outcault and Winsor McCay; mid-century comics by John Stanley, Otto Soglow, and Ernie Bushmiller; and contemporary alternative work by Jason, Chris Ware, Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez — as well as the Fight or Run comics of Kevin Huizenga. He will cover approaches to this work that draw on linguistics and anthropology. He’ll also discuss the use he’s made of these approaches in his comics classes. Jonathan Bass has taught comics courses in the English Department and School of Fine Arts at Rutgers University since 2007.  His own comics and other graphic work can be found at: http://www.tigershorts.com/

82nd meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium , Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentation: Jeffrey Greene on The Artist in Prison.  The presentation will feature hundreds of images of narrative artworks produced in prison, bodies of work by individual artists assembled over years of incarceration, special projects, publications and exhibition installations illustrating over two decades of fascinating endeavors inside Connecticut’s prisons. An artist, musician, curator and lecturer, Jeffrey Greene has been organizing visual arts workshops, collectives, projects, programs, exhibitions and publications in prisons (and in the outside community) for the past 23 years.  He has worked directly with over 2,000 inmates and organized well over 250 exhibitions, publications and projects.  He serves as the Prison Arts Program manager for Community Partners in Action, a Hartford, Connecticut organization started in 1875.

81st meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentations by Sophie Yanow and Sam Alden. Sophie Yanow will discuss journaling and nonlinear storytelling, and show slides from her new book War of Streets and Houses (Uncivilized Books, 2014), a queer cartoon memoir on urban planning and popular revolt. Sophie Yanow was born north of San Francisco in 1987. In 2011 she moved to Montreal, and with the Colosse collective published In Situ, her acclaimed autobiographical comics series. She was an invited artist-researcher for the Canadian Center for Architecture’s “C for Condo” workshop, and her work has been exhibited throughout the US and Canada. She lives in Montreal. Sam Alden‘s talk will focus on what he’s learned in the last year about materials and their effect on a narrative. Sam Alden was born in 1988 in Portland, Oregon. In 2013 he was nominated for three Ignatz Awards, and won for Promising New Talent; his work has since been selected twice for The Best American Comics series. His first collection, It Never Happened Again, is debuting from Uncivilized Books in Spring 2013. Sam lives in Montreal.

80th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Ernie Gehr will present and discuss a selection of his films emphasizing the “animation” of the moving image.  In non-technical terms  one could interpret that as meaning “what have you got between the eyes, and is it of any use”. Ernie Gehr began to work with film in 1967, and with digital media in 1999.  He has completed approx. 70 works, ranging in duration from 3 to 74 minutes.  For his innovative work, Gehr has received various awards and fellowships, including The Maya Deren Award  from The American Film Institute, The Stan Brakhage Vision Award from the Denver International Film Festival as well as a Guggenheim fellowship.  Over the years Gehr has taught at various schools, including the San Francisco Art Institute, U.C. Berkeley, and most recently at Harvard.  In October of last year a program of his recent works were shown at the New York Film Festival, and an essay on those pieces was published in the January 2014 print issue of Artfor

79th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium, Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby).  Presentation: Patricia Mainardi on Picture Stories/Stories with Pictures.
At the same time that Rodolfe Topffer was creating his first comic books (1830s), book illustration was undergoing a parallel transformation. New printing techniques encouraged hundreds of illustrations instead of the few characteristic of earlier publications. Artists were now faced with new questions: What to draw? How to draw? How to integrate text and image? Patricia Mainardi will survey the parallel history of illustrated books and comic books, mirror images of each other in their first flower of development.
Patricia Mainardi is an art historian, professor emerita in the doctoral program in art history at the City University of New York . A specialist in nineteenth-century art, she has published numerous books and articles on topics from painting to comics and is currently completing  a book on nineteenth-century illustrated print culture, including comics, caricature, and illustrated books and periodicals.

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Illustration: Tony Johannot, “And so, in the guise of friendship, the villain managed to steal my brain, which he took for himself, for, as my head shrunk in volume, his grew larger.” From Tony Johannot, Alfred de Musset and P.-J. Stahl, Travel Where You Will, Book Written with Pen and Crayon, with Vignettes, Legends, Episodes, Commentaries, Incidents, Notes and Poetry, 1843.
[Tony Johannot, C’est ainsi que, sous la voile de l’amitié, le scélérat vint à bout de s’emparer de ma cervelle, dont il fit son profit, car à mesure que ma tête diminuait de volume, la sienne grossissait….   Tony Johannot, Alfred de Musset and P.-J. Stahl, Voyage où il vous plaira, livre écrit à la plume et au crayon, avec vignettes, légendes, épisodes, commentaires, incidents, notes et poésie, 1843]

The 78th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Presentations: Huguette Martel on her work and Michael Lobel on John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration.

Huguette Martel will present some of her New Yorker cartoons as well as her most recent narrative work: The Adventures of a would-be Filmmaker. Her main concern is the relationship between pictures and text and also how to tell very personal stories in a discreet, hopefully humorous way. Huguette Martel was born in France in 1938; the daughter of Lithuanian Jews, she spent World War II hiding with a  peasant family.  She’s been living in New York since she was 19. A graduate from Cooper Union, she started by doing large abstract-expressionist paintings. For the last 25 years, she has concentrated on narrative paintings:  painted images combined with a painted texts on canvas.  In the early 90s, the New Yorker magazine published a series of her cartoons and full-color pages.  She has shown in several galleries; in 2007, she had a one-man show in at Congregation Beth Elohim in Brooklyn, NY. Lately, she’s gone from wall paintings to a smaller format designed for books.

Michael Lobel on John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration. This talk will explore the importance of illustration to 20th-century American artist John Sloan’s artistic career. Better known as a member of The Eight and the Ashcan School, Sloan began his professional life as a commercial illustrator, working for more than a decade on newspapers like the Philadelphia Press and later for mass-market magazines. The talk will include numerous archival images, including newspaper word puzzles and comic strips, which will be used to highlight Sloan’s distinctive approach and to provide further insight into illustration as a modern visual form.  Michael Lobel is a professor of art history and director of the MA Program in Modern and Contemporary Art, Criticism and Theory at Purchase College, SUNY. In addition to regular exhibition catalog essays and articles on modern and contemporary art, his publications include three books: Image Duplicator: Roy Lichtenstein and the Emergence of Pop Art (2002); James Rosenquist: Pop Art, Politics and History in the 1960s (2009); and John Sloan:Drawing on Illustration, recently published by Yale University Press.

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painting by Huguette Martel

 

The seventy-seventh meeting: Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at The New School, Room A404 at 66 West 12th St., New York City. Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: This event is taking place at Johnson/Kaplan Hall of The New School.

Presentation: Matthew Thurber on “Secrets of INFOMANIACS, or How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cloud.” Matthew Thurber started posting a webcomic about the internet in February 2011, starring Ralph, an online-addicted youth with a hard drive in his forehead, and Amy Shit, an activist rapper whose parents have mysteriously vanished. INFOMANIACS quickly developed into a densely layered spy thriller dealing with issues of privacy and control. Eerily foreshadowing headlines with Snowden and Wikileaks soon to be splattered everywhere, INFOMANIACS was released in October 2013 by PictureBox (soon to cease publishing…coincidence?) Learn the intriguing backstory of this comic strip: the shadowy meetings with librarians, the influence of unlikely muses such as  Dave Berg, the dropboxes that “fell off a truck”, clandestine schemes for embedding real people into the strip, and plotting techniques which nearly caused a nervous breakdown!

Matthew Thurber is an artist and musician living in Brooklyn. He is the author of numerous comics including 1-800-MICE and INFOMANIACS. Thurber is the co-founder of Tomato House gallery and of the Potlatch, I Gather books-on-tape label. He performs as Ambergris, and with Brian Belott as Court Stenographer and Young Sherlock Holmes. http://www.matthewthurber.com

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The seventy-sixth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Jennifer George and Charles Kochman on The Art of Rube Goldberg. Not many of us make it into the dictionary as an adjective. But then again, Rube Goldberg was no ordinary noun. He was a cartoonist, humorist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor, and in a 72-year career he wrote and illustrated nearly 50,000 cartoons which were syndicated in daily newspapers throughout the world. In The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts) author Jennifer George celebrates all aspects of her grandfather’s life by showcasing more than seven hundred illustrations, alongside an introduction by bestselling author Adam Gopnik and other essayists, providing a definitive look at this quintessential American cartoonist.

Jennifer George is the granddaughter of Rube Goldberg. She is a writer and a jewelry and clothing designer. For almost twenty years her label was carried at Bergdorf Goodman, Barney’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdales, and dozens of other specialty stores across the U.S. She lives in New York City.

Charles Kochman is the editorial director of Abrams ComicArts, and editor of the #1 bestselling series Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney. Kochman has edited several hundred books for all age groups. Prior to Abrams, Kochman was the first editor of licensed publishing at DC Comics and MAD magazine.
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The seventy-fifth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Mark Alan Stamaty on his life, his work and other metaphysical questions.

Mark Alan Stamaty was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He grew up in a New Jersey beach town, the only child of two professional cartoonists. He attended Cooper Union where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1969.
Mark is the author-illustrator of ten books. His children’s books include Who Needs Donuts? (1973, 2003), Alia’s Mission (2005), Too Many Time Machines (1999), Small in the Saddle (1975), Minnie Maloney & Macaroni (1976), and Where’s My Hippopotamus?(1977).
In 1977–1978, Mark’s panoramic centerfold cartoons of Greenwich Village and Times Square for the Village Voice attracted widespread attention and were sold by the Village Voice as posters. He then created a series of comic strips for that paper, including MacDoodle St., which was later published as a comic strip novel.
In 1981 Meg Greenfield, editorial page editor of the Washington Post, asked Mark to create a comic strip about Washington for her op-ed page. Mark traveled to D.C. to do extensive research, and in November of that year the Post and the Village Voice jointly debuted his new creation, Washingtoon, featuring, among many other characters, Congressman Bob Forehead, chairman of the JFK-Look-Alike Caucus. The comic strip’s popularity with Post and Voice readers led to its being picked up by more than 40 newspapers, including the Boston Globe, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Austin-American Statesman.
From 1994 to 1996, Mark was the political cartoonist for Time Magazine. From 2001 to 2003, he produced the monthly comic strip Boox for the New York Times Book Review. His cartoon reporting has covered a variety of events for GQMagazine and The New Yorker, including men’s fashion shows in Milan, the 2001 Baseball All-Star Game, the Washington Redskins’ training camp, the Madison Square Garden 1992 25th-Anniversary Concert honoring Bob Dylan, the buzz around Washington during President Clinton’s grand jury testimony, a UFO convention, and many more.
Mark has created covers for The New Yorker, the New Republic, the Washington Post Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, and others. His cartoons and illustrations have appeared in many publications, including Slate Magazine, Esquire, New York Magazine, Harper’s, Newsweek, Playboy, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times Magazine.
Mark’ was the recipient of two Gold Medals and a Silver Medal from the Society of Illustrators, the Premio “Satira Politica” Forte Dei Marmi 2005 from the Museum of Satire in Forte Dei Marmi, Italy, and a Page One Award from the Newspaper Guild of New York. His illustrations have been selected for the Communication Arts Annual and the American Illustration Annual.
In 2005, Mark produced a series of full-color comic strips and  commentary on the Los Angeles mayoral campaign for the Los Angeles Times. In 2007, Mark received the Augustus Saint Gaudens Award for Career Achievement in Art from Cooper Union. Presently, his work includes fulfilling a two-book contract with Knopf Children’s Books and a variety of free-lance assignments.

stamaty detailMark Alan Stamaty, A Cartoon Legacy (detail), from The New Yorker, 2011

The seventy-fourth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, Kellen auditorium, 66 Fifth Ave. Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentations by Conor Stechschulte and Christopher Adams.

Conor Stechschulte on To and From The Amateurs: A comprehensive look at the ideas and influences that lead to the making of The Amateurs, the lessons learned while making it, and how I’ve applied those lessons to my current comics work. Other topics that may or may not be glancingly addressed: accidental dismemberment, the true sound a screaming pig makes, drawing comics while standing up, and what affineurs and cartoonists have in common. Conor Stechschulte began self-publishing comics in 2005 as a member of the Closed Caption Comics collective in Baltimore. Since then he has made more than a dozen acclaimed hand-made books. His work has appeared in Happiness!, Smoke Signal, and Sundays, on the notable list for both Best American Comics and Best American Non-Required Reading, and in national and international art exhibitions. A reprint of his graphic novel, The Amateurs is forthcoming from Fantagraphics in 2014.

Christopher Adams will talk about his work and some of the work that appeals to him and the direct and indirect connections between the two. Specifically he will talk about the non-comics work that appeals to him. Specifically work that is somewhat brief, dry, technical and descriptive. Work that brings to mind instruction manuals or user guides. Work from different fields. He will also talk about how he likes to think about looking in relation to this work and how that informs what he would like to draw and paint and write. And ultimately how he would like to proceed making comics that are maybe not comics. Christopher Adams is an artist and musician who lives and works in Baltimore. He has made three comic books: Period, Strong Eye Contact and Yule Log – all published by 2D Cloud. He has made two music albums: Baby Hair and Vegetables. He also sells art supplies.

Stechschulte imageConor Stechschulte

chrisadams imageChristopher Adams

The seventy-third meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Keren Katz will discuss and show work from the small history of cartooning in Israel as represented in three recently published catalogs by The Israeli Museum of Caricature and Comics. She will sample artwork from these catalogs, representing three time periods, focusing on work by contemporary Israeli cartoonists. She will also share slides from her thesis work and her documentation of guerrilla poetry readings at the MoMA.
Keren Katz is an Israeli illustrator and cartoonist based in New York. A graduate of the Illustration as Visual Essay MFA program, School of Visual Arts (New York) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Jersusalem), she has contributed comics to anthologies worldwide, self published six graphic novels and many zines. Titles include: Crossing the Rubikon, Chronicles of the Falling Women, Before The Dark Gate, Rashomon Ramat-Gan, Joseph and his Amazing Technicolor Coat Check Dream, Were You Watching?, The Night Poetry Class in Room 1001, and Uncontested Spaces which will be published by No Press. For more of her work visit: http://kerenkatz.carbonmade.com/

kerenkatz imagesmall

The seventy-second meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Jonathan Barli on The Mad World of Virgil Partch. An in-depth look at the life and art of one of the most influential and trendsetting cartoonists of his generation. The talk will be illustrated by scores of unseen photographs and artwork, cover Partch’s life and times and how they influenced his artistic sensibilities, and include a thorough analysis of his cartooning and the context in which his work appeared. From a remote island off the coast of Alaska and a stint as an animator at Disney Studios during its golden age, Partch burst onto the scene with his zany, sometimes surreal, but always hilarious cartoons, catapulting his career virtually overnight. An artist truly ahead of his time, his unique perspective and style ensured he would become one of the most prolific cartoonists of his era, and solidified his role in inspiring generations of cartoonists, animators, and illustrators.

Jonathan Barli is a designer, writer, and filmmaker. He was educated at the School of Visual Arts and soon after graduating, co-founded Rosebud Archives: a company dedicated to preserving and celebrating the cultural heritage of the graphic arts, where he serves as Art Director. He recently wrote, edited, and designed a book on the renowned cartoonist Virgil Partch. He has done design work for Fantagraphics Books, the Theodore Roosevelt Association, Ron Garofalo Photography and others.

Vip talk image

The seventy-first meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Misha Beletsky on Visual Storytelling in Early 20th c. Russian Illustrated Book
Early Soviet books were created in a period of complete devastation of the printing trade, and an astonishing outburst of creativity that made up for all technical deficiencies. These talks will examine new ways words and images came together to tell a story in illustrated books for children and adults of the period.

Misha 1 Part One: Legacy of the Avant-Garde: Word Play and Picture Play
The art of children’s books flourished in the first two decades after the 1917 Revolution. The medium attracted some of the most important artists of this period (including Lissitsky, Lebedev, and Tatlin) and authors (including Mayakovsky, Marshak, and the OBERIU group). Rapidly, the language of the fringe Avant-Garde movements displaced the mainstream of Russian art. Illustrated books, like other media, were thoroughly reinvented. For a limited time, until the onset of the officially-mandated Socialist Realist esthetic in the mid-30s, unbridled experimentation in visual storytelling was equated with political progress and promoted by the new regime. We will focus on the artists and the movements that defined this era.
Misha 2Part Two: The Space of Time: Moscow School of Wood Engraving
Scarcity of photoengraving materials, combined with dismal printing quality in the post-Civil-War Moscow brought about a resurgence of handmade line cuts, or wood engravings. Formerly utilized mainly to reproduce pen-and-ink drawings, the technique came into its own as a group of talented Moscow artists including Favorsky, Piskarev, and Goncharov adopted it as their medium of choice. Eschewing complete rejection of tradition by their Constructivist colleagues, these artists carefully studied world heritage of printmaking retaining those elements they felt relevant to the modern experience and letting go of the others. They felt equally comfortable with elements of contemporary Avant-Garde idiom and occasionally utilized them in their work. Of particular interest to us are the concepts of time and space, as interpreted in single-panel compositions by Vladimir Favorsky and his followers.
Misha Beletsky is a graphic designer and design historian. He is the author of Book Covers by Ismar David. Misha has been the art director of Abbeville Press, a publisher of fine illustrated books in New York for over a decade.

The seventieth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, December 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Bob Sikoryak on the history of adapting literature into comics. “Throughout the last century, many cartoonists have adapted classic novels and plays; I’ll discuss the history of these reinterpretations, with images from over 100 years of comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. They are by turns respectful, hilarious, and revelatory. Perhaps the most famous attempts were made in the 1940’s Classics Illustrated series, but there have been many inventive and exhilarating comics adaptations published, from the “Minute Movies” comic strip of the 1910’s to the many ambitious books of today.” — Bob Sikoryak

R. Sikoryak is the author of Masterpiece Comics (Drawn & Quarterly). He’s drawn for The Onion, The New Yorker, GQ, MAD, SpongeBob Comics, and Nickelodeon Magazine, among many other publications, as well as the TV series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.  He’s done storyboards and design work for Augenblick Studios on their animated projects Ugly Americans, the SNL Midnight Snack shorts, and the upcoming Zoolander. He teaches in the Parsons Illustration Department and at the Center for Cartoon Studies, and he hosts the live cartoon slide show series Carousel.

CI.TomSawyer.cvr1

The sixty-ninth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, December 2, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Brian Dewan on his work with the filmstrip: a simple medium customarily used for educational purposes for most of the twentieth century. It delivers a cinematic experience without a moving picture.
The I-CAN-SEE filmstrips (script, pictures and music by Brian Dewan) employ an unseen narrator’s recorded voice punctuated with music, sound effects and a periodic signal-tone which instructs the projectionist to advance the hand-cranked filmstrip projector. Color illustrations projected a single frame at a time unspool in the time honored tradition of the once ubiquitious educational strips screened in classrooms and school cafeterias for most of the twentieth century. Ranging from unexpurgated folk and religious stories to modern treatises on historical, scientific and theological subjects, titles include “Before the White Man Came,” “The Course Of Your Research,” “Obey Signals,”  “The Death Of The Hen,” “Deuteronomy” and “The Tide Waits For No Man.”

Brian Dewan has been making filmstrips since 1986. They have been screened at Pierogi gallery in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the New Museum and The Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles. His published musical recordings include Tells The Story, The Operating Theater, Words Of Wisdom and Ringing At The Speed Of Prayer. He lives in Catskill, NY.
Brian_and_filmstrip_projector

The sixty-eighth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, November 25, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations by Brendan Leach and Nick Sousanis.

Brendan Leach’s new graphic novel, Iron Bound, features a flex disc of music written and recorded by Lucas Gutkowski. Brendan will be discussing the writing of the book and the process of collaborating with the songwriter. Lucas Gutkowski and Alex Obercian will preform the songs accompanied by artwork from Iron Bound.
Brendan Leach is an Ignatz and Xeric Award winning Graphic Novelist and Illustrator. His comics have been published by Top Shelf Comics, Secret Acres, Retrofit Comics, Ca et La (France), and 001 Edizioni (Italy and Spain). Brendan’s illustration work has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators and 3×3 Magazine, and his comics have been included in collections and anthologies, including Best American Comics 2011 and 2013, Stephen Heller’s Comics Sketchbooks, Strapazin (Germany), and Smoke Signals. He is currently a faculty member at the Fashion Institute of Technology, teaching drawing and writing for sequential art. Brendan received his MFA in Illustration from the School of Visual Arts.
Nick Sousanis will discuss and share images from his doctoral dissertation, written and drawn entirely in comic book form.  Some background: While words have long been held up as the sole means of serious thinking, images have been typically relegated to aesthetics and spectacle. This bias runs deep. Plato dismissed images as “shadows of shadows,” Descartes sowed doubt of sensory perception, and Western thought and the academy have followed these lines of thinking since. Through an argument embodied in its visual form, Sousanis’s comics dissertation poses a challenge to verbal-linguistic dominance and seeks to broaden the forms academic inquiry can take. In their capacity for both text-like sequential reading and image-like simultaneous viewing, comics offer a unique thought-space to facilitate discovery and present a powerful tool for serious inquiry. Titled Unflattening, the dissertation employs the mechanisms by which we see as metaphors for considering new approaches to how we think and how we learn. For a brief overview of this work, see here.
Nick Sousanis is a doctoral candidate at Columbia University’s school of education writing and drawing his dissertation entirely in comic book form. Previously, he was immersed in Detroit’s arts community where he co-founded www.thedetroiter.com and directed UM’s Detroit exhibition space. His comics have been infiltrating academic realms through numerous presentation, publications, and his comics courses at Teachers College and Parsons. Dissertation excerpts and more at www.spinweaveandcut.com.
IRON BOUNDcovrt

Sousanis+Oxford+poster+Smallimages by Brendan Leach (top) and Nick Sousanis (bottom).

The sixty-seventh meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: T Edward Bak‘s on the natural history and works which inspire and inform the narrative of his book, Island of Memory: Volume 1 of WILD MAN – The Natural History of Georg Wilhelm Steller, The author’s presentation on process, research, and travel experiences will be followed by an audience Q&A.

T Edward Bak teaches and lectures on comics in the Pacific Northwest, where he studies Environmental Studies. He was the 2007 Center for Cartoon Studies Fellow and is the cartoonist of Service Industry, and WILD MAN – The Natural History of Georg Wilhelm Steller. His stories appear in The Graphic Canon, The Best American Comics, MOME, and Drawn & Quarterly Showcase. A native of Colorado, he often migrates throughout North America but usually resides in Portland, Oregon.
tedwardbak

The sixty-sixth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, November 11, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations: Gregory Benton will discuss his new book B+F, winner of an Award of Excellence at this year’s MoCCA.

Gregory Benton has been making comix since 1993. He cut his teeth on the political anthology World War 3, moving on to writing and drawing stories for Nickelodoeon, Vertigo, DC Comics, Disney Adventures, Watson-Guptil, Entertainment Weekly, as well as contributing to numerous alternate-press comix anthologies. A graphic novel, Hummingbird, was published by Slave Labor Graphics in 1996. Gregory has also produced numerous limited-edition mini-comix. His illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, The Village Voice and Fortune, among others. Most recently, his book B+F was awarded the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art’s inaugural Award of Excellence at MoCCAFest 2013. An expanded version of B+F will be published in the autumn of 2013 through Adhouse Books (USA) and Editions ça et la (France).

Seth Kushner will be presenting his Photocomix work and discussing his fascination with fumetti and how he plans to use sequential photographic narrative in the future.

Seth Kushner is an award-winning photographer and writer.  His photography has appeared in The NY Times Magazine, Time, L’Uomo Vogue, Sports Illustrated, The New Yorker and more.  His published books include Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origins of American Comics, (2012, co-authored with Christopher Irving) The Brooklynites (2007, co-authored with Anthony LaSala) and the recently released, self-published fumetti anthology FORCE FIELD FOTOCOMIX VOL.01. and his semi-autobio comic SCHMUCK Comix #1. Seth’s comics work can be seen at TripCity.net and for more info, visit SethKushner.com.

Benton cover copyGregory Benton (left), Seth Kushner (right)

The sixty-fifth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, November 4, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Moderaters: Nick Sousanis and Tom Motley

Presentations:  Amy Kurzweil on Decaying Sense: How comics compose memory. Chris Ware intuits that “comics is a possible metaphor for memory and recollection,” while Art Spiegelman asserts that “comics work the way the brain works…past, present, and future all butted up against each other – the perfect medium for depicting memory.” As a prose-writer and a comics-creator concerned with depicting the past and the inner lives of my characters, I wondered: what is unique about comics’ ability to map memory? As part of my graduate thesis here at The New School, I turned a critical eye to form. Join me as I analyze comic pages – from the work of great masters to the sketches public school children – asking: what, specifically, do comics afford in the timeless task of putting the past on the page?
Amy Kurzweil is an emerging cartoonist and fiction writer. She graduated from The New School’s MFA writing program in May of 2013. She was Norman Mailer Fellow for fiction writing this past summer, and she was recently short-listed for the Posen Foundation’s Writing Fellowship for her graphic-memoir in progress, Flying Couch. The memoir, her graduate thesis, tells the story of three generations of women in her family. Amy has drawn 152 of the 280 pages of her book – but it’s not like she’s counting or anything. When Amy is not writing or drawing, she teaches writing or drawing. Recovering from a stint in the public schools, Amy now teaches at FIT and Parson’s school of Art and Design History and Theory.

Charlie Boatner on How to Read a Comic Book. Comic books are easy to read, so it’s tempting to read them too quickly and miss much of what they have to offer.  Charlie Boatner will demonstrate how comics graphics can be decoded to reveal theme and artist point-of-view, using techniques adapted from film analysis (particularly the study of Visual Style).   He will illustrate his talk with two issues of the ground-breaking Green Lantern/Green Arrow series of the early 70s.

Charlie Boatner  wrote his bachelor’s thesis on comic books in 1977.  He went on to write stories for titles like Action, Marvel Fanfare, and Tales of Terror, as well as an article for The Comics Journal.  With artist Steve Parkhouse, he created the graphic novel, The Hiding Place in 1990.  From 2004 to 2010 Charlie answered children’s questions in the letters pages of DC Comics’ Scooby-Doo and Super Friends.

garfield-dreaming-of-garfield-sleeping

The sixty-fourth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations : JOE KUBERT: A VisuaLecture by Arlen Schumer
“As we look back 500 years ago on the Renaissance masters of figurative art like Michelangelo and Raphael, so too will future art historians 500 years from now look back on an artistic giant who walked the earth in our time, a graphic artist nonpareil who made pen and brush marks like no one on earth before or after him: the one, the only . . . Joe Kubert (1926-2012)! Kubert entered the comic book field in the 1940s as a teenager drawing for DC Comics, and then went on to become one of the legendary figures of the medium, whose style is unmistakable and unforgettable, the most expressive pen-and-brush comic book artist of his generation.From his quintessential Hawkman and Sgt. Rock features, to his definitive rendition of Tarzan in the 1970s, to the many graphic novels he created in his later career, this singular stylist is showcased via super-graphic comic book panel and page projections that put the “visual” in “VisuaLecture.” http://www.arlenschumer.com” – Arlen Schumer

Arlen Schumer is a member of The Society of Illustrators, creating comic book-style illustrations for advertising and editorial usage, and one of the foremost historians of comic book art—his book The Silver Age of Comic Book Art won the Independent Publishers Award for Best Popular Culture Book of 2003.  He is a recognized expert in Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone and the music of Bruce Springsteen and lectures on these and other pop culture subjects at universities and cultural institutions nationwide. http://www.arlenschumer.com schumer

The sixty-third meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, October 21, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations : Aaron Beebe will discuss his artwork and the relationship between text and image outside the realm of illustration, delving into the chart, the map, and the curatorial label as material for art making.
Aaron Beebe is a Brooklyn based artist and curator. His work uses many of the conventions of museological display and archival practice to explore the picture-story relationship.  His use of text, his carefully crafted frames and surfaces, and the often surprising windows and vitrines embedded into his paintings merge text and image to create stories in an indirect and evasive fashion that evokes rather than explains – engaging a method of scholarship that obscures as much as it defines and celebrates curiosity more than it embraces certainty.  Much of his work uses typographic and cartographic elements, as well as framing and binding techniques that play with the conventional boundaries of the painting, the artists’ book, and the curatorial label.

Phil Nel on Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby: The Greatest Comic Strip You’ve Never Read
Philip Nel investigates the appeals of Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby (1942-1952), a comic strip critically acclaimed but rarely read. Starring its 5-year-old title character and Mr. O’Malley (the lad’s loquacious con-artist of a fairy godfather), the strip combined fantasy and satire, a child’s feeling of wonder and an adult’s wariness, highly literate jokes and a keen eye for the ridiculous. This delicate balance of wit and whimsy is both the genius of Barnaby, and the reason for its limited ― if devoted ― following. The darling of the smart set then and now (its fans include Dorothy Parker, Art Spiegelman, Duke Ellington, Chris Ware), Barnaby has come to embody Mark Twain’s definition of a classic: “a book which people praise and don’t read.” Helping us understand why we should read it, Nel’s illustrated presentation explores the wry humor, modernist aesthetic, and inspiration behind Johnson’s comic.
Philip Nel is University Distinguished Professor of English and Director of Kansas State University’s Program in Children’s Literature. His most recent books are: Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby Volume One: 1942-1943 (co-edited with Eric Reynolds, 2013), Crockett Johnson and Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children’s Literature (2012), and Keywords for Children’s Literature (co-edited with Lissa Paul, 2011). He also blogs at Nine Kinds of Pie <www.philnel.com> and tweets as @philnel.

nelandbeebe copy

The sixty-second meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, October 14, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Prof. William H. Foster III on The Forgotten Black Kings of Underground Comix. In recent scholarship documenting the rise of American Underground Comix, the names and work of Black artists and writers has been sadly missing — creators like Richard “Grasshopper” Green, Larry Fuller, Kevin Taylor and Skylar Owens, just to name a just a few. Come find out more about these unsung kings and the impressive body of work they created in a multimedia presentation that is sure to entertain and enlighten. (Presentation contains Adult images.)
 
William H. Foster III has been a writer since the age of 8 and published since age 11. Poet, essayist, playwright, and editorialist, he has written 15 books and 10 plays. He is presently a Professor of English at Naugatuck Valley Community College in Waterbury, Connecticut. Professor Foster holds a BA from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, MA, and a Masters degree from Wesleyan University.

A long-time comic book collector and researcher, Professor Foster has been an expert commentator for both CNN News and National Public Radio. He was a consultant on the historical image of Blacks in both comic strips and comic books for the Words and Pictures Museum of Fine Sequential Art in Northampton, MA, and also a consultant to the 2004 exhibit, “Heroes, Heartthrobs, and Horrors: Celebrating Connecticut’s Invention of the American Comic Book” presented by the Connecticut Historical Society.

His exhibit on the “Changing Image of Blacks in Comics” has been displayed at a number of venues across the country, including Temple University’s Paley Library, the 1998 Comic-Con International Comic Arts Conference, the 2000 Festival of Arts and Ideas and in 2012 for the Texas Visual Arts Association in Dallas. He presented his research at the 2001 conference of The International Association for Media and History in Leipzig, Germany and at the 2002 Conference on Analyzing Series & Serial Narrative at John Moores University in Liverpool, England. In 2007 Professor Foster’s exhibit was displayed at both the Geppi Entertainment Museum in Maryland and the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art in New York. He was an invited speaker to the 2007 International Symposium on Langston Hughes at Central China Normal University in Wuhan, China. In 2008 he was appointed to the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Comic Art. In 2010 his research was sited in the Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. In 2011 he appeared as an expert on the PBS series, History Detectives. In that same year he spoke at the International Popular Culture Association conference in San Jose, Costa Rica. In 2012 he was an invited speaker at the Atl.Com Festival in Malmo, Sweden, and the Comics Forum in Leeds, England.

1972 G. GreenRichard “Grasshopper” Green,, 1972

The sixty-first meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, October 7, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Last January the Nirthfolde Visitors’ Bureau ‘occupied’ the premises of the Northfield (MN) Arts Guild Gallery. Nirthfolde is a bucolic, yet bustling burg situated in a parallel universe that neatly overlaps the small college town in southern Minnesota. Created by David Lefkowitz and Doug Bratland, the Visitors’ Bureau featured misinformation panels, ahistorical artifacts, and other displays designed to perplex and amaze.
David Lefkowitz will present a talk describing the Visitors’ Bureau, and the degree to which our understanding of place is always constructed through stories that combine fact and fiction.

David Lefkowitz’s work in painting, installation, and mixed media addresses everyday paradoxes of perception, and larger questions that arise from them. Much of the work explores the blurry boundary between the human-built environment and the natural world.  He is Associate Professor of Art at Carleton College. Recent solo exhibits include “Other Positioning Systems” at the Rochester Art Center, and “Facilities and Grounds” at the Carrie Secrist Gallery in Chicago. His paintings of trompe l’oeil wall fixtures appear in “Lifelike” which originated at the Walker Art Center and is currently on exhibit at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, TX. Website: http://www.davidlefkowitz.net/
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The sixtieth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, September 30, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Miriam Katin will discuss her two graphic novels We Are On Our Own, a memoir of  childhood in Budapest during the Second World War, and Letting It Go – an account of her reaction to her son’s move to Berlin.
Miriam Katin was born in 1942 in Budapest, emigrated to Israel in 1957 where she apprenticed in Commercial Art — drawing all the time with great passion – and served in the Israeli Defense Forces as a Graphic Artist. She moved to New York in 1963. Worked in animation  for Ein Gedi Animation, Jumbo Pictures- Nickelodeon, MTV and Disney. Her first comic was published in 2001. Her first graphic novel, We Are On Our Own (2006) was followed by the recent  Letting It Go, both published by Drawn & Quarterly.

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The fifty-ninth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Monday, September 23, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

David Prudhomme will offer a survey of his comic-strip work from its beginnings to the present time. He will try (but probably won’t have enough time or lucidity) to explain how the evolution of his approach to narrative – a structure of stokes, splashes, points, panels and pages – evokes an architecture of time. He will offer a few examples of comics that represent, for him, specific and fascinating time capsules.
David Prudhomme was born in 1969 and lives in Bordeaux, France. Left handed, hairless and myopic, he is also a graduate of the Arts School of Angoulême. His books reflect a diversity of styles and subject matter from the Louvre museum to musketeers. He will launch Rebetiko, a comic about Greek music published by SelfMadeHero, at the Brooklyn Book Festival in September 2013.

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Presentation on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at The New School, Room A404 at 66 West 12th St., New York City. Matthew Thurber on “Secrets of INFOMANIACS, or How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cloud.” Matthew Thurber started posting a webcomic about the internet in February 2011, starring Ralph, an online-addicted youth with a hard drive in his forehead, and Amy Shit, an activist rapper whose parents have mysteriously vanished. INFOMANIACS quickly developed into a densely layered spy thriller dealing with issues of privacy and control. Eerily foreshadowing headlines with Snowden and Wikileaks soon to be splattered everywhere, INFOMANIACS was released in October 2013 by PictureBox (soon to cease publishing…coincidence?) Learn the intriguing backstory of this comic strip: the shadowy meetings with librarians, the influence of unlikely muses such as  Dave Berg, the dropboxes that “fell off a truck”, clandestine schemes for embedding real people into the strip, and plotting techniques which nearly caused a nervous breakdown! Matthew Thurber is an artist and musician living in Brooklyn. He is the author of numerous comics including 1-800-MICE and INFOMANIACS. Thurber is the co-founder of Tomato House gallery and of the Potlatch, I Gather books-on-tape label. He performs as Ambergris, and with Brian Belott as Court Stenographer and Young Sherlock Holmes. http://www.matthewthurber.com

Presentation on Monday, March 3, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Will Eisner Week event: “Will Eisner: Champion of the Graphic Novel.” Writer Paul Levitz (former president/publisher of DC Comics) will read from Will Eisner: The Dreamer and the Dream, Levitz’s work-in-progress (to be published in 2015 by Abrams ComicArts), about Eisner’s unique role in the evolution of the American Graphic Novel, and a discussion of the factors that came together to create the preconditions that finally made the form successful. Paul Levitz is a comic fan (The Comic Reader), editor (Batman, among many titles), writer (Legion of Super-Heroes, Worlds’ Finest, and many others including four NY Times Graphic Books Best Sellers), executive (30 years at DC, ending as President & Publisher), historian (75 Years of DC Comics: The Art Of Modern Myth-Making (Taschen, 2010)) and educator (including teaching The American Graphic Novel at Columbia).  He won two consecutive annual Comic Art Fan Awards for Best Fanzine, received Comic-con International’s Inkpot Award, the prestigious Bob Clampett Humanitarian Award, and the Comics Industry Appreciation Award from ComicsPro. His Taschen book won the Eisner Award, the Eagle Award and Munich’s Peng Pris, and is being released in revised form as five volumes in 2013-20144. Levitz also serves on the board of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

Presentation on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Jennifer George and Charles Kochman on The Art of Rube Goldberg. Not many of us make it into the dictionary as an adjective. But then again, Rube Goldberg was no ordinary noun. He was a cartoonist, humorist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor, and in a 72-year career he wrote and illustrated nearly 50,000 cartoons which were syndicated in daily newspapers throughout the world. In The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts) author Jennifer George celebrates all aspects of her grandfather’s life by showcasing more than seven hundred illustrations, alongside an introduction by bestselling author Adam Gopnik and other essayists, providing a definitive look at this quintessential American cartoonist. Jennifer George is the granddaughter of Rube Goldberg. She is a writer and a jewelry and clothing designer. For almost twenty years her label was carried at Bergdorf Goodman, Barney’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdales, and dozens of other specialty stores across the U.S. She lives in New York City. Charles Kochman is the editorial director of Abrams ComicArts, and editor of the #1 bestselling series Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney. Kochman has edited several hundred books for all age groups. Prior to Abrams, Kochman was the first editor of licensed publishing at DC Comics and MAD magazine. Article on the event by Stephen Moles can be found here.

Presentation on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Mark Alan Stamaty on his life, his work and other metaphysical questions. Mark Alan Stamaty was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He grew up in a New Jersey beach town, the only child of two professional cartoonists. He attended Cooper Union where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1969.
Mark is the author-illustrator of ten books. His children’s books include Who Needs Donuts? (1973, 2003), Alia’s Mission (2005), Too Many Time Machines (1999), Small in the Saddle (1975), Minnie Maloney & Macaroni (1976), and Where’s My Hippopotamus?(1977).
In 1977–1978, Mark’s panoramic centerfold cartoons of Greenwich Village and Times Square for the Village Voice attracted widespread attention and were sold by the Village Voice as posters. He then created a series of comic strips for that paper, including MacDoodle St., which was later published as a comic strip novel.
In 1981 Meg Greenfield, editorial page editor of the Washington Post, asked Mark to create a comic strip about Washington for her op-ed page. Mark traveled to D.C. to do extensive research, and in November of that year the Post and the Village Voice jointly debuted his new creation, Washingtoon, featuring, among many other characters, Congressman Bob Forehead, chairman of the JFK-Look-Alike Caucus. The comic strip’s popularity with Post and Voice readers led to its being picked up by more than 40 newspapers, including the Boston Globe, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Austin-American Statesman.
From 1994 to 1996, Mark was the political cartoonist for Time Magazine. From 2001 to 2003, he produced the monthly comic strip Boox for the New York Times Book Review. His cartoon reporting has covered a variety of events for GQMagazine and The New Yorker, including men’s fashion shows in Milan, the 2001 Baseball All-Star Game, the Washington Redskins’ training camp, the Madison Square Garden 1992 25th-Anniversary Concert honoring Bob Dylan, the buzz around Washington during President Clinton’s grand jury testimony, a UFO convention, and many more.
Mark has created covers for The New Yorker, the New Republic, the Washington Post Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, and others. His cartoons and illustrations have appeared in many publications, including Slate Magazine, Esquire, New York Magazine, Harper’s, Newsweek, Playboy, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times Magazine.
Mark’ was the recipient of two Gold Medals and a Silver Medal from the Society of Illustrators, the Premio “Satira Politica” Forte Dei Marmi 2005 from the Museum of Satire in Forte Dei Marmi, Italy, and a Page One Award from the Newspaper Guild of New York. His illustrations have been selected for the Communication Arts Annual and the American Illustration Annual.
In 2005, Mark produced a series of full-color comic strips and  commentary on the Los Angeles mayoral campaign for the Los Angeles Times. In 2007, Mark received the Augustus Saint Gaudens Award for Career Achievement in Art from Cooper Union. Presently, his work includes fulfilling a two-book contract with Knopf Children’s Books and a variety of free-lance assignments. An article on the event by Julia Alekseyeva can be found here.

Presentations on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, The Bark Room. Presentations by Conor Stechschulte and Christopher Adams. Conor Stechschulte on To and From The Amateurs: A comprehensive look at the ideas and influences that lead to the making of The Amateurs, the lessons learned while making it, and how I’ve applied those lessons to my current comics work. Other topics that may or may not be glancingly addressed: accidental dismemberment, the true sound a screaming pig makes, drawing comics while standing up, and what affineurs and cartoonists have in common. Conor Stechschulte began self-publishing comics in 2005 as a member of the Closed Caption Comics collective in Baltimore. Since then he has made more than a dozen acclaimed hand-made books. His work has appeared in Happiness!, Smoke Signal, and Sundays, on the notable list for both Best American Comics and Best American Non-Required Reading, and in national and international art exhibitions. A reprint of his graphic novel, The Amateurs is forthcoming from Fantagraphics in 2014. Christopher Adams will talk about his work and some of the work that appeals to him and the direct and indirect connections between the two. Specifically he will talk about the non-comics work that appeals to him. Specifically work that is somewhat brief, dry, technical and descriptive. Work that brings to mind instruction manuals or user guides. Work from different fields. He will also talk about how he likes to think about looking in relation to this work and how that informs what he would like to draw and paint and write. And ultimately how he would like to proceed making comics that are maybe not comics. Christopher Adams is an artist and musician who lives and works in Baltimore. He has made three comic books: Period, Strong Eye Contact and Yule Log – all published by 2D Cloud. He has made two music albums: Baby Hair and Vegetables. He also sells art supplies.

Presentation on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Keren Katz will discuss and show work from the small history of cartooning in Israel as represented in three recently published catalogs by The Israeli Museum of Caricature and Comics. She will sample artwork from these catalogs, representing three time periods, focusing on work by contemporary Israeli cartoonists. She will also share slides from her thesis work and her documentation of guerrilla poetry readings at the MoMA. Keren Katz is an Israeli illustrator and cartoonist based in New York. A graduate of the Illustration as Visual Essay MFA program, School of Visual Arts (New York) and Bezalel Academy of Art and Design (Jersusalem), she has contributed comics to anthologies worldwide, self published six graphic novels and many zines. Titles include: Crossing the Rubikon, Chronicles of the Falling Women, Before The Dark Gate, Rashomon Ramat-Gan, Joseph and his Amazing Technicolor Coat Check Dream, Were You Watching?, The Night Poetry Class in Room 1001, and Uncontested Spaces which will be published by No Press. For more of her work visit: http://kerenkatz.carbonmade.com/ An article on the event by Alexander Rothman can be read here.

Presentation on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Jonathan Barli on The Mad World of Virgil Partch. An in-depth look at the life and art of one of the most influential and trendsetting cartoonists of his generation. The talk will be illustrated by scores of unseen photographs and artwork, cover Partch’s life and times and how they influenced his artistic sensibilities, and include a thorough analysis of his cartooning and the context in which his work appeared. From a remote island off the coast of Alaska and a stint as an animator at Disney Studios during its golden age, Partch burst onto the scene with his zany, sometimes surreal, but always hilarious cartoons, catapulting his career virtually overnight. An artist truly ahead of his time, his unique perspective and style ensured he would become one of the most prolific cartoonists of his era, and solidified his role in inspiring generations of cartoonists, animators, and illustrators. Jonathan Barli is a designer, writer, and filmmaker. He was educated at the School of Visual Arts and soon after graduating, co-founded Rosebud Archives: a company dedicated to preserving and celebrating the cultural heritage of the graphic arts, where he serves as Art Director. He recently wrote, edited, and designed a book on the renowned cartoonist Virgil Partch. He has done design work for Fantagraphics Books, the Theodore Roosevelt Association, Ron Garofalo Photography and others.

Presentation on Monday, December 16, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Misha Beletsky on Visual Storytelling in Early 20th c. Russian Illustrated Book. Early Soviet books were created in a period of complete devastation of the printing trade, and an astonishing outburst of creativity that made up for all technical deficiencies. These talks will examine new ways words and images came together to tell a story in illustrated books for children and adults of the period. Part One: Legacy of the Avant-Garde: Word Play and Picture Play. The art of children’s books flourished in the first two decades after the 1917 Revolution. The medium attracted some of the most important artists of this period (including Lissitsky, Lebedev, and Tatlin) and authors (including Mayakovsky, Marshak, and the OBERIU group). Rapidly, the language of the fringe Avant-Garde movements displaced the mainstream of Russian art. Illustrated books, like other media, were thoroughly reinvented. For a limited time, until the onset of the officially-mandated Socialist Realist esthetic in the mid-30s, unbridled experimentation in visual storytelling was equated with political progress and promoted by the new regime. We will focus on the artists and the movements that defined this era. Part Two: The Space of Time: Moscow School of Wood Engraving. Scarcity of photoengraving materials, combined with dismal printing quality in the post-Civil-War Moscow brought about a resurgence of handmade line cuts, or wood engravings. Formerly utilized mainly to reproduce pen-and-ink drawings, the technique came into its own as a group of talented Moscow artists including Favorsky, Piskarev, and Goncharov adopted it as their medium of choice. Eschewing complete rejection of tradition by their Constructivist colleagues, these artists carefully studied world heritage of printmaking retaining those elements they felt relevant to the modern experience and letting go of the others. They felt equally comfortable with elements of contemporary Avant-Garde idiom and occasionally utilized them in their work. Of particular interest to us are the concepts of time and space, as interpreted in single-panel compositions by Vladimir Favorsky and his followers. Misha Beletsky is a graphic designer and design historian. He is the author of Book Covers by Ismar David. Misha has been the art director of Abbeville Press, a publisher of fine illustrated books in New York for over a decade. Article on the event by Emily Decker here.

Presentation on Monday, December 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Bob Sikoryak on the history of adapting literature into comics. “Throughout the last century, many cartoonists have adapted classic novels and plays; I’ll discuss the history of these reinterpretations, with images from over 100 years of comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels. They are by turns respectful, hilarious, and revelatory. Perhaps the most famous attempts were made in the 1940′s Classics Illustrated series, but there have been many inventive and exhilarating comics adaptations published, from the “Minute Movies” comic strip of the 1910′s to the many ambitious books of today.” — Bob Sikoryak. R. Sikoryak is the author of Masterpiece Comics (Drawn & Quarterly). He’s drawn for The Onion, The New Yorker, GQ, MAD, SpongeBob Comics, and Nickelodeon Magazine, among many other publications, as well as the TV series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart.  He’s done storyboards and design work for Augenblick Studios on their animated projects Ugly Americans, the SNL Midnight Snack shorts, and the upcoming Zoolander. He teaches in the Parsons Illustration Department and at the Center for Cartoon Studies, and he hosts the live cartoon slide show series Carousel. Article on the event by Mark Lerer here.

Presentation on Monday, December 2, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Brian Dewan on his work with the filmstrip: a simple medium customarily used for educational purposes for most of the twentieth century. It delivers a cinematic experience without a moving picture.
The I-CAN-SEE filmstrips (script, pictures and music by Brian Dewan) employ an unseen narrator’s recorded voice punctuated with music, sound effects and a periodic signal-tone which instructs the projectionist to advance the hand-cranked filmstrip projector. Color illustrations projected a single frame at a time unspool in the time honored tradition of the once ubiquitious educational strips screened in classrooms and school cafeterias for most of the twentieth century. Ranging from unexpurgated folk and religious stories to modern treatises on historical, scientific and theological subjects, titles include “Before the White Man Came,” “The Course Of Your Research,” “Obey Signals,”  “The Death Of The Hen,” “Deuteronomy” and “The Tide Waits For No Man.” Brian Dewan has been making filmstrips since 1986. They have been screened at Pierogi gallery in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the New Museum and The Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles. His published musical recordings include Tells The Story, The Operating Theater, Words Of Wisdom and Ringing At The Speed Of Prayer. He lives in Catskill, NY. Article on this event by Andrea Tsurumi here.

Presentations on Monday, November 25, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Brendan Leach and Nick Sousanis. Brendan Leach’s new graphic novel, Iron Bound, features a flex disc of music written and recorded by Lucas Gutkowski. Brendan will be discussing the writing of the book and the process of collaborating with the songwriter. Lucas Gutkowski and Alex Obercian will preform the songs accompanied by artwork from Iron Bound. Brendan Leach is an Ignatz and Xeric Award winning Graphic Novelist and Illustrator. His comics have been published by Top Shelf Comics, Secret Acres, Retrofit Comics, Ca et La (France), and 001 Edizioni (Italy and Spain). Brendan’s illustration work has been recognized by the Society of Illustrators and 3×3 Magazine, and his comics have been included in collections and anthologies, including Best American Comics 2011 and 2013, Stephen Heller’s Comics Sketchbooks, Strapazin (Germany), and Smoke Signals. He is currently a faculty member at the Fashion Institute of Technology, teaching drawing and writing for sequential art. Brendan received his MFA in Illustration from the School of Visual Arts.
Nick Sousanis will discuss and share images from his doctoral dissertation, written and drawn entirely in comic book form.  Some background: While words have long been held up as the sole means of serious thinking, images have been typically relegated to aesthetics and spectacle. This bias runs deep. Plato dismissed images as “shadows of shadows,” Descartes sowed doubt of sensory perception, and Western thought and the academy have followed these lines of thinking since. Through an argument embodied in its visual form, Sousanis’s comics dissertation poses a challenge to verbal-linguistic dominance and seeks to broaden the forms academic inquiry can take. In their capacity for both text-like sequential reading and image-like simultaneous viewing, comics offer a unique thought-space to facilitate discovery and present a powerful tool for serious inquiry. Titled Unflattening, the dissertation employs the mechanisms by which we see as metaphors for considering new approaches to how we think and how we learn. For a brief overview of this work, see here. Nick Sousanis is a doctoral candidate at Columbia University’s school of education writing and drawing his dissertation entirely in comic book form. Previously, he was immersed in Detroit’s arts community where he co-founded www.thedetroiter.com and directed UM’s Detroit exhibition space. His comics have been infiltrating academic realms through numerous presentation, publications, and his comics courses at Teachers College and Parsons. Dissertation excerpts and more at www.spinweaveandcut.com. Article on this event by Andrea Tsurumi here.

Presentation on Monday, November 18, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. T Edward Bak‘s on the natural history and works which inspire and inform the narrative of his book, Island of Memory: Volume 1 of WILD MAN – The Natural History of Georg Wilhelm Steller, The author’s presentation on process, research, and travel experiences will be followed by an audience Q&A. T Edward Bak teaches and lectures on comics in the Pacific Northwest, where he studies Environmental Studies. He was the 2007 Center for Cartoon Studies Fellow and is the cartoonist of Service Industry, and WILD MAN – The Natural History of Georg Wilhelm Steller. His stories appear in The Graphic Canon, The Best American Comics, MOME, and Drawn & Quarterly Showcase. A native of Colorado, he often migrates throughout North America but usually resides in Portland, Oregon. Article on this event by Emily Decker here.

Presentations on Monday, November 11, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Gregory Benton will discuss his new book B+F, winner of an Award of Excellence at this year’s MoCCA. Gregory Benton has been making comix since 1993. He cut his teeth on the political anthology World War 3, moving on to writing and drawing stories for Nickelodoeon, Vertigo, DC Comics, Disney Adventures, Watson-Guptil, Entertainment Weekly, as well as contributing to numerous alternate-press comix anthologies. A graphic novel, Hummingbird, was published by Slave Labor Graphics in 1996. Gregory has also produced numerous limited-edition mini-comix. His illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, The Village Voice and Fortune, among others. Most recently, his book B+F was awarded the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art’s inaugural Award of Excellence at MoCCAFest 2013. An expanded version of B+F will be published in the autumn of 2013 through Adhouse Books (USA) and Editions ça et la (France).

Seth Kushner will be presenting his Photocomix work and discussing his fascination with fumetti and how he plans to use sequential photographic narrative in the future. Seth Kushner is an award-winning photographer and writer.  His photography has appeared in The NY Times Magazine, Time, L’Uomo Vogue, Sports Illustrated, The New Yorker and more.  His published books include Leaping Tall Buildings: The Origins of American Comics, (2012, co-authored with Christopher Irving) The Brooklynites (2007, co-authored with Anthony LaSala) and the recently released, self-published fumetti anthology FORCE FIELD FOTOCOMIX VOL.01. and his semi-autobio comic SCHMUCK Comix #1. Seth’s comics work can be seen at TripCity.net and for more info, visit SethKushner.com. An article by Keren Katz on these presentations can be found here.

Presentations on Monday, November 4, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Moderaters: Nick Sousanis and Tom Motley. Amy Kurzweil on Decaying Sense: How comics compose memory. Chris Ware intuits that “comics is a possible metaphor for memory and recollection,” while Art Spiegelman asserts that “comics work the way the brain works…past, present, and future all butted up against each other – the perfect medium for depicting memory.” As a prose-writer and a comics-creator concerned with depicting the past and the inner lives of my characters, I wondered: what is unique about comics’ ability to map memory? As part of my graduate thesis here at The New School, I turned a critical eye to form. Join me as I analyze comic pages – from the work of great masters to the sketches public school children – asking: what, specifically, do comics afford in the timeless task of putting the past on the page?
Amy Kurzweil is an emerging cartoonist and fiction writer. She graduated from The New School’s MFA writing program in May of 2013. She was Norman Mailer Fellow for fiction writing this past summer, and she was recently short-listed for the Posen Foundation’s Writing Fellowship for her graphic-memoir in progress, Flying Couch. The memoir, her graduate thesis, tells the story of three generations of women in her family. Amy has drawn 152 of the 280 pages of her book – but it’s not like she’s counting or anything. When Amy is not writing or drawing, she teaches writing or drawing. Recovering from a stint in the public schools, Amy now teaches at FIT and Parson’s school of Art and Design History and Theory.

Charlie Boatner on How to Read a Comic Book. Comic books are easy to read, so it’s tempting to read them too quickly and miss much of what they have to offer.  Charlie Boatner will demonstrate how comics graphics can be decoded to reveal theme and artist point-of-view, using techniques adapted from film analysis (particularly the study of Visual Style).   He will illustrate his talk with two issues of the ground-breaking Green Lantern/Green Arrow series of the early 70s. Charlie Boatner  wrote his bachelor’s thesis on comic books in 1977.  He went on to write stories for titles like Action, Marvel Fanfare, and Tales of Terror, as well as an article for The Comics Journal.  With artist Steve Parkhouse, he created the graphic novel, The Hiding Place in 1990.  From 2004 to 2010 Charlie answered children’s questions in the letters pages of DC Comics’ Scooby-Doo and Super Friends. Article on this event by Andrea Tsurumi here.

Presentation on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.  JOE KUBERT: A VisuaLecture by Arlen Schumer. “As we look back 500 years ago on the Renaissance masters of figurative art like Michelangelo and Raphael, so too will future art historians 500 years from now look back on an artistic giant who walked the earth in our time, a graphic artist nonpareil who made pen and brush marks like no one on earth before or after him: the one, the only . . . Joe Kubert (1926-2012)! Kubert entered the comic book field in the 1940s as a teenager drawing for DC Comics, and then went on to become one of the legendary figures of the medium, whose style is unmistakable and unforgettable, the most expressive pen-and-brush comic book artist of his generation.From his quintessential Hawkman and Sgt. Rock features, to his definitive rendition of Tarzan in the 1970s, to the many graphic novels he created in his later career, this singular stylist is showcased via super-graphic comic book panel and page projections that put the “visual” in “VisuaLecture.” http://www.arlenschumer.com” – Arlen Schumer. Arlen Schumer is a member of The Society of Illustrators, creating comic book-style illustrations for advertising and editorial usage, and one of the foremost historians of comic book art—his book The Silver Age of Comic Book Art won the Independent Publishers Award for Best Popular Culture Book of 2003.  He is a recognized expert in Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone and the music of Bruce Springsteen and lectures on these and other pop culture subjects at universities and cultural institutions. An article on this presentation by Delaney Gibbons can be found here.

Presentation on Monday, October 21, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Aaron Beebe will discuss his artwork and the relationship between text and image outside the realm of illustration, delving into the chart, the map, and the curatorial label as material for art making.
Aaron Beebe is a Brooklyn based artist and curator. His work uses many of the conventions of museological display and archival practice to explore the picture-story relationship.  His use of text, his carefully crafted frames and surfaces, and the often surprising windows and vitrines embedded into his paintings merge text and image to create stories in an indirect and evasive fashion that evokes rather than explains – engaging a method of scholarship that obscures as much as it defines and celebrates curiosity more than it embraces certainty.  Much of his work uses typographic and cartographic elements, as well as framing and binding techniques that play with the conventional boundaries of the painting, the artists’ book, and the curatorial label.

Phil Nel on Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby: The Greatest Comic Strip You’ve Never Read
Philip Nel investigates the appeals of Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby (1942-1952), a comic strip critically acclaimed but rarely read. Starring its 5-year-old title character and Mr. O’Malley (the lad’s loquacious con-artist of a fairy godfather), the strip combined fantasy and satire, a child’s feeling of wonder and an adult’s wariness, highly literate jokes and a keen eye for the ridiculous. This delicate balance of wit and whimsy is both the genius of Barnaby, and the reason for its limited ― if devoted ― following. The darling of the smart set then and now (its fans include Dorothy Parker, Art Spiegelman, Duke Ellington, Chris Ware), Barnaby has come to embody Mark Twain’s definition of a classic: “a book which people praise and don’t read.” Helping us understand why we should read it, Nel’s illustrated presentation explores the wry humor, modernist aesthetic, and inspiration behind Johnson’s comic.
Philip Nel is University Distinguished Professor of English and Director of Kansas State University’s Program in Children’s Literature. His most recent books are: Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby Volume One: 1942-1943 (co-edited with Eric Reynolds, 2013), Crockett Johnson and Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children’s Literature (2012), and Keywords for Children’s Literature (co-edited with Lissa Paul, 2011). He also blogs at Nine Kinds of Pie <www.philnel.com> and tweets as @philnel.

Presentation on Monday, October 14, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Prof. William H. Foster III on The Forgotten Black Kings of Underground Comix. In recent scholarship documenting the rise of American Underground Comix, the names and work of Black artists and writers has been sadly missing — creators like Richard “Grasshopper” Green, Larry Fuller, Kevin Taylor and Skylar Owens, just to name a just a few. Come find out more about these unsung kings and the impressive body of work they created in a multimedia presentation that is sure to entertain and enlighten. (Presentation contains Adult images.) William H. Foster III has been a writer since the age of 8 and published since age 11. Poet, essayist, playwright, and editorialist, he has written 15 books and 10 plays. He is presently a Professor of English at Naugatuck Valley Community College in Waterbury, Connecticut. Professor Foster holds a BA from the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, MA, and a Masters degree from Wesleyan University. A long-time comic book collector and researcher, Professor Foster has been an expert commentator for both CNN News and National Public Radio. He was a consultant on the historical image of Blacks in both comic strips and comic books for the Words and Pictures Museum of Fine Sequential Art in Northampton, MA, and also a consultant to the 2004 exhibit, “Heroes, Heartthrobs, and Horrors: Celebrating Connecticut’s Invention of the American Comic Book” presented by the Connecticut Historical Society. His exhibit on the “Changing Image of Blacks in Comics” has been displayed at a number of venues across the country, including Temple University’s Paley Library, the 1998 Comic-Con International Comic Arts Conference, the 2000 Festival of Arts and Ideas and in 2012 for the Texas Visual Arts Association in Dallas. He presented his research at the 2001 conference of The International Association for Media and History in Leipzig, Germany and at the 2002 Conference on Analyzing Series & Serial Narrative at John Moores University in Liverpool, England. In 2007 Professor Foster’s exhibit was displayed at both the Geppi Entertainment Museum in Maryland and the Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art in New York. He was an invited speaker to the 2007 International Symposium on Langston Hughes at Central China Normal University in Wuhan, China. In 2008 he was appointed to the Editorial Board of the International Journal of Comic Art. In 2010 his research was sited in the Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture. In 2011 he appeared as an expert on the PBS series, History Detectives. In that same year he spoke at the International Popular Culture Association conference in San Jose, Costa Rica. In 2012 he was an invited speaker at the Atl.Com Festival in Malmo, Sweden, and the Comics Forum in Leeds, England.

Presentation on Monday, October 7, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Last January the Nirthfolde Visitors’ Bureau ‘occupied’ the premises of the Northfield (MN) Arts Guild Gallery. Nirthfolde is a bucolic, yet bustling burg situated in a parallel universe that neatly overlaps the small college town in southern Minnesota. Created by David Lefkowitz and Doug Bratland, the Visitors’ Bureau featured misinformation panels, ahistorical artifacts, and other displays designed to perplex and amaze.
David Lefkowitz will present a talk describing the Visitors’ Bureau, and the degree to which our understanding of place is always constructed through stories that combine fact and fiction. David Lefkowitz’s work in painting, installation, and mixed media addresses everyday paradoxes of perception, and larger questions that arise from them. Much of the work explores the blurry boundary between the human-built environment and the natural world.  He is Associate Professor of Art at Carleton College. Recent solo exhibits include “Other Positioning Systems” at the Rochester Art Center, and “Facilities and Grounds” at the Carrie Secrist Gallery in Chicago. His paintings of trompe l’oeil wall fixtures appear in “Lifelike” which originated at the Walker Art Center and is currently on exhibit at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, TX. Website: http://www.davidlefkowitz.net/   An article on the event by Emily Decker can be read here.

Presentation on Monday, September 30, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Miriam Katin will discuss her two graphic novels We Are On Our Own, a memoir of  childhood in Budapest during the Second World War, and Letting It Go – an account of her reaction to her son’s move to Berlin.
Miriam Katin was born in 1942 in Budapest, emigrated to Israel in 1957 where she apprenticed in Commercial Art — drawing all the time with great passion – and served in the Israeli Defense Forces as a Graphic Artist. She moved to New York in 1963. Worked in animation  for Ein Gedi Animation, Jumbo Pictures- Nickelodeon, MTV and Disney. Her first comic was published in 2001. Her first graphic novel, We Are On Our Own (2006) was followed by the recent  Letting It Go, both published by Drawn & Quarterly. Article on the event by Keren Katz here.

Presentation on Monday, September 23, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. David Prudhomme will offer a survey of his comic-strip work from its beginnings to the present time. He will try (but probably won’t have enough time or lucidity) to explain how the evolution of his approach to narrative – a structure of stokes, splashes, points, panels and pages – evokes an architecture of time. He will offer a few examples of comics that represent, for him, specific and fascinating time capsules. David Prudhomme was born in 1969 and lives in Bordeaux, France. Left handed, hairless and myopic, he is also a graduate of the Arts School of Angoulême. His books reflect a diversity of styles and subject matter from the Louvre museum to musketeers. He will launch Rebetiko, a comic about Greek music published by SelfMadeHero, at the Brooklyn Book Festival in September 2013. Article on the event by Andrea Tsurumi here.

Presentation on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Zeina Abirached analyzes her four comic books published to date, all of them autobiographical: Beyrouth Catharsis [Beirut Catharsis] (2006), 38, rue Youssef Semaani [38 Youssef Semaani Street] (2006), Mourir Partir Revenir: Le jeu des hirondelles (2007), [published in English as A Game for Swallows: To Die, To Live, To Return] (2012) and Je me souviens: Beyrouth [I Remember: Beirut] (2008). She focuses especially here on the dimensions of time and space, history and geography, memory and autobiography, in her work. She also discusses the influence of OuLiPo, and especially the writings of Georges Perec, on her comics. Article on the event by Sophia Wiedeman here.

Presentation on Monday, September 9, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. Anne Emond and Josh Bayer, New York based DIY cartoonists, will discuss the development of their bodies of work,  audience  and their personal goals and objectives. The night will begin with a slide show/ reading of their work and culminate with the two interviewing each other, each bringing 13 questions devoted to the other artist. Expect a lively, organic interaction between two complex and often unpredictable cartoonists. An article on the event by Keren Katz is here.

Monday, Sept. 2, 2013 Labor Day no meeting.

Presentation on Monday, August 26, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room. In Your Place: Bishakh Som’s Other Worlds and Once-Removed Life Stories features anonymous memoirist and imaginary geographer Bishakh Som in conversation with art-pulp comic scripter and semiotician-for-hire Adam McGovern. Bishakh creates living landscapes of visionary techno-wilderness and puts turningpoints of life and possible paths of history on paper with astounding compositional novelty and immediate emotional familiarity. He draws on his accomplished architectural training to manipulate the comic page’s optical topography in entirely fresh ways, and refers to his trans-cultural background to create dramas of bitter ebullience and comforting disorientation. A contributor to the acclaimed Graphic Canon 3, Bishakh will read a story from his pending anthology Apsara Engine, show works from across his career and its future, and talk with Adam and the audience about constructed images and reconstructed lives.

Presentation on Monday, August 19, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in room 1104.  Panel Sequence Workshop.  Cartooning instructor, Tom Motley, will present a slideshow and discussion on cinematic sequences in comics, followed by a related cartooning worksheet. This will be a fun sequential art exercise to stimulate comics professionals and fans alike. Drawing skills are welcome but not necessary.

Presentation on Monday, August 12, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Facilitator: Bob Sikoryak. Nathan Bulmer and Connie Sun are New York cartoonists who both draw a daily web comic strip. That is where the similarities end. Beyond this, they have completely different approaches and styles to daily comics and are, in fact, bitter adversaries.
Come join them for the 54th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-Story Symposium where they will talk about making comics, interrogate each other, and battle for domination (Or crack some jokes and giggle a lot. Either way, it will be fun!) Article on the event by Sophia Wiedeman.

July 29 and August 5, 2013: No events.

Presentation on Monday, July 22, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY.   Meghan Turbitt will answer the world’s burning question: what the HELL happened to her after she took Lauren Weinstein’s cartooning class in 2008? Comics presented will include the absurd and psychedelic “Lady Turbo and the Terrible Cox Sucker,” autobiographical gag (literally) comics and mini stories including the titles “Conan” and “Becoming a Kennedy.”
Katie Skelly will explore the influences of fashion design/advertising, genre films, and specific representations of human anatomy in art history in my work. Article on the event by Sophia Wiedeman.

Presentation on Monday, July 15, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY. Michael Joseph on Lynd Ward’s Vertigo: Strategies for Creating a Voice in a Silent Novel. For his final “wordless” novel, Vertigo, published in 1937, Lynd Ward created four block sizes, allowing each size a different range of narrative and affective values. With particular emphasis on the smallest (2″ x 2″) block, and its emotional and dramatic tonalities, I will discuss how creating narrative sequences of regularly varied image sizes endows Vertigo with a sense of directorial voice, and how it creates patterns that resist the centrifugal force of linearity.

Presentation on Monday, July 8, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY.  N. C. Christopher Couch on American Comics: Comics are an international medium, with antecedents in a variety of cultures and with great time depth, from Hogarth prints to Japanese scrolls and Mesoamerican pictorial manuscripts from Indigenous nations. However, the major media of comics, and the major commercial success of the comic art medium, depends on prototypes and tropes developed in the United States. Certainly this is due to the dominance of American mass culture and its role as an economic and even imperialistic export. But it is also related to the construction of American society from immigrant groups and the means and media of their socialization, as well as the early role of industrialization in the propagation of mass culture in the United States. Newspaper comics strips were developed for and on the steam-driven rotary presses of cities filled with immigrants. Comic books and superheroes flooded the national market, served by truck and rail distribution, and united by other mass pictorial publications developing at the same moment such as Life magazine and the penetration of radio along the paths of electrification under the new deal. American mass media has mastered the art of producing popular culture in small, concentrated and aesthetically driven studios, from fashion houses to television production companies to comics studios, whose products then become mass media artifacts. This process repeated in the graphic novel, from the studios of artists to New York trade houses to the IP factories annexed to Hollywood. Even comics revolutions, like Underground Comix, began in the United States and became internationally influential. An article on the event by Keren Katz can be found here.

Presentation on Monday, July 1, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY. Samantha Meier on Women’s Comix: Where Were Gender Politics in Underground Comix? Much has been written about Robert Crumb and other founding fathers of the underground comix movement, but early comix by women have gone largely unstudied, framed  as a “feminist intervention” into the sexist countercultural comics industry. The realities of seminal books like Wimmen’s Comix and Tits & Clits are much more complex. Beyond the printed pages of the comics themselves lies a greater story about women finding their voices in the ‘70s, ‘80s, and beyond.

Presentation on Monday, June 24, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Facilitator: Connie Sun. R. Sikoryak will talk about using digital tools in comics and illustration work, specifically the Cintiq pen display and Wacom tablet, as well as programs such as Photoshop and InDesign.  He will also discuss the ways he integrates traditionally drawn elements (that is, watercolors and ink drawings) into mainly digital work.

Presentation on Monday, June 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY. Winners, Losers and Voyeurs:  Drawing at the Race Track. Brooklyn-based artist Jen Ferguson travels to the most exotic of local places, Aqueduct and Belmont race track, to observe, draw, and occasionally blend in with the railbirds and speculators who congregate there. In this talk she will discuss her working style, drawing at the track, and the inspiration that setting has provided. She will also present drawings from her book Railbirds, My LIfe at the Track, and Out of Luck, based on HBO’s series Luck which she currently illustrates. Article on the event by Andrea Tsurumi here.

Presentation on Monday, June 10, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Bluestockings bookstore, 172 Allen St, New York, NY. Making Multimedia Comics with Creatavist. Senior Producer Olivia Koski of the Atavist will showcase a new publishing tool called Creatavist that allows comics artists to add sound and other interactive elements to their work. She will give us a behind-the-scenes look at Josh Neufeld and Tori Marlan’s Stowaway, an incredible true story of exploitation, bravery, and survival. An article on the event by Keren Katz can be found here.

Presentation on Monday, June 3, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Carmine Infantino: a VisuaLecture by Arlen Schumer.  This presentation will be Live Streamed click here for connection. In this retrospective/eulogy for legendary comic book artist Carmine Infantino (1925-2013), comic book historian Arlen Schumer (The Silver Age of Comic Book Art) presents an overview of the artist’s work, spotlighting Infantino’s definitive versions of DC Comics’ superheroes The Flash, Adam Strange and Batman. An article on the event by Andrea Tsurumi can be found here.

Presentations on May 20, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, room 1104.  Tahneer Oksman will discuss women’s and Jewish identity as depicted in contemporary autobiographical comics. She will focus primarily on works by Aline Kominsky Crumb, Vanessa Davis, and Lauren Weinstein.

Presentations on Monday, May 13, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, room 1104. Antony Huchette on his upcoming book Brooklyn Quesadillas and his thoughts about cartooning and Nick Abadzis on his recent work.

Presentations on Monday, May 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in room 1104Andrea Tsurumi on her thesis project, Behold the Killbot and Other Stories. This collection of short stories contains historical brawls, a messed-up bedtime story, and short absurd comics. Belgian comics artist Eric Lambé will discuss his work and his new book, Le fils du roi, currently on display at the Center for Book Arts as part of the exhibit “From Bande Dessinée to Artist’s Book: Testing the Limits of Franco-Belgian Comics.” An article on the event by Keren Katz can be found here.

Presentation on Monday, April 29, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room. Peter Kuper on Drawn to New York, an illustrated chronicle of three decades in Manhattan and New York as a subject for artists. An article on the event by Keren Katz can be found here.

Presentation on Monday, April 22, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room. Superman at 75. Action Comics #1, which went on sale in April 1938, brought the world the debut of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s SUPERMAN, and the beginning of the superhero phenomenon.The character’s complex legacy—in both fictional and real-world terms—is discussed by Danny Fingeroth (author of Superman on the Couch), Peter Sanderson (comics historian), and Jeff Trexler (comics legal commentator). An article on the event by Andrea Tsurumi.

Presentation on Monday, April 15, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room. Evan Neely, on “Comics’ Belated Modernism: Missed Conversations  between Comics and Gallery Art.”

Presentation on Monday, April 8, 2013 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room. Charles Brownstein, Executive Director of the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, on People v. Kirkpatrick a significant 1970 case where two Manhattan bookstore clerks were arrested and convicted of selling obscene material because of comics in Zap #4.  Brownstein will recount how work by pioneers including R. Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, Spain, Robert Williams, and others who contributed to this issue was deemed legally obscene in the first ever obscenity conviction for comic book material. An article on the event by Jess Ruliffson.

Presentation on Monday, April 1, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room (off lobby). Artist/writer Ben Katchor in conversation with Gil Roth on the occasion of the publication of Hand-Drying in America (Pantheon Books) — a collection of strips from Metropolis Magazine on the subjects of architecture and design. Join us for this live audience recording of The Virtual Memories Show podcast.  An article on the event by Connie Sun.

Presentation on Monday, March 18, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room (off lobby). How to make a digital comics magazine. Symbolia cofounder Erin Polgreen joins us via Skype to discuss the ins and outs of launching a digital publication. Article on the event by Connie Sun.

Presentation on Monday, March 11, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in Room 1104. In recognition of Will Eisner’s deserved place among the storytelling greats, and as part of Will Eisner Week 2013 (www.willeisnerweek.com/), Columbia University professor Jeremy Dauber and comics writer and scholar Danny Fingeroth will discuss the oeuvre of the master cartoonist (who would have turned 96 on March 6) in the context of Jewish-American literature. Article on the event by Andrea Tsurumi.  Also article by Hannah Menzies.

Presentation on Monday, March 4, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in Room 1104. Michael Joseph on An Essential Irreconcilability: Research in How Comics Resist the Ritual of Disembodiment. Article on the event by Keren Katz here.

Presentation on Monday, February 25, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in The Bark Room. James Romberger on his latest books 7 Miles a Second and Post York with a slide show and special musical performance by Crosby.    Article on the event by Jess Worby here.

Presentation on Monday, February 11, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in Room 1103. Jack Feldstein and Lea Mairet on Paradox, their collaborative work-in-progress combining illustration and time-based video.

Presentation on Monday, February 4, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in the Bark Room (lobby). Ellla (kookoo) Cohen on her work and Keren Katz on her graphic novels. Facilitator: Ben Katchor. Article on Israelis artists Ella (kookoo) Cohen and Omer Hoffman by Keren Katz.

Presentation on Monday, January 28, 2013 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in the Bark Room (lobby). Nicolas Grivel, of the Nicolas Grivel Agency, on the state of comics publishing in Europe and America. Facilitator: Ben Katchor.

Presentation on Monday, Dec. 17, 2012 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in the Bark Room (lobby). Dave Kelly and Lara Antal on their collaborative work and publishing.

Presentation on Monday, Dec. 10, 2012 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street in room 1103. Seymour Chwast on his graphic novels based on the classics.

Presentations on Monday, Dec. 3 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Room 1103. Victor Kerlow and Josh Burggraf on their own work and comic jams. A comic jam produced  by the participants that evening.

Presentations on Monday, Nov. 27 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room. Mark Lerer on the history of comics fanzines. Nick Sousanis on comics as a legitimate means of scholarly discourse.

Presentations on Monday, Nov. 19, 2012 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Room 1103. Jess Worby on his first long-form comic. Jess Ruliffson on her recent reportage comics.

Presentations on Monday, Nov. 12, 2012 at 7:00 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room. Omer Hoffmann on his work. Florent Ruppert on his latest projects. Article on Israelis artists Ella (kookoo) Cohen and Omer Hoffman by Keren Katz.

Presentations on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark room. Eli Valley on his life and work. Also see: Philosophy and Law: How Not to Read Cartoons: Commentary Takes Fuzzy Aim at Eli Valley

Presentations on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, room 1103. Cancelled due to storm.

Presentations on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, room 1103. Stephen Kroninger on his Grand Central Station project.

Presentations on Monday, Oct. 15, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, room 1103. Mark Lerer on his current project and Sophia Wiedeman on her work .

Presentations on Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room. Matthew Thurber on Science-Fiction as Contemporary Life and Kurt Hoss on his creative process for comics and the visual arts.

Presentations on Monday, Oct. 1, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room. Part 2: Cartoon Provocateurs: the non-existent red lines of Charlie Hebdo. Facilitator: Ben Katchor

Presentations on Monday, Sept. 24, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, Bark Room.. Deana Sobel on her work. Eddy Portnoy on Cartoon Provocateurs: the non-existent red lines of Charlie Hebdo. Facilitator: Ben Katchor

Presentations on Monday, Sept. 17, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 66 Fifth Ave. room 818. Arlen Schumer offers copies of his 16-page, full-color verbal/visual essay on The Auteur Theory of Comics online to raise money for the Jack Kirby Museum. Facilitator: Ben Katchor

Presentations on Monday, Sept. 10, 2012 at Parsons The New School, 66 Fifth Avenue, room 818. Jude Killory and Kriota Wilberg on Injury Prevention for Cartoonists. Facilitator: Connie Sun. 

No meeting September 3, 2012 – Labor Day

Presentations on Monday, August 27, 2012 at Russell Hall, The Teachers College Library, Columbia University, 525 West 120th Street, NYC. Robert Berry and Alexander Rothman  Facilitator: Peter Quach.

Presentations on Monday, August 20, 2012 at  The Lounge at Dixon Place, 161A Chrystie Street, NYC. Simon Fraser and Andrea Tsurumi. Facilitator: Adam Tyrrell .

Presentations on Monday, August 13, 2012 at  The Lounge at Dixon Place, 161A Chrystie Street, NYC. R. Sikoryak and Mimi Pond. Facilitator: Kriota Willberg

Presentations on Monday, August 6, 2012 at Columbia Univeristy, Butler Hall. Liana Finck and  Ted Stearn. Facilitator: Nick Sousanis.

Presentations on Monday, July 30, 2012 at Columbia Univeristy, Butler Hall. Danny Fingeroth on the life and work of Harvey Pekar and Felipe Galindo on his Manhatitlan project.  Facilitator: Alexander Rothman.

Presentations on Monday, July 23, 2012 at The School of Visual Arts, 132 West 21st St., NYC. Jack Feldstein, Mark Delboy and Aaron Cockle. Facilitator: Andrea Tsurumi.

Presentations on Monday, July 16, 2012 at The School of Visual Arts, 132 West 21st St., NYC. Video of Leah Wishnia’s presentation

Presentations on Monday, July 2, 2012 at The  School of Visual Arts, 132 West 21st Street, NYC. R. Sikoryak’s presentation

Presentations on Monday, June 25, 2012 at The  School of Visual Arts, 132 West 21st Street, NYC. Adam McGovern: Found in Translation: The Elusive Art and Inexact Science of Comics Across Cultures

Presentations on Monday, June 18, 2012 at The  School of Visual Arts, 132 West 21st Street, NYC. Connie Sun on her work andTom Eaton on his work.

Presentations on Monday, June 11, 2012 at Columbia Univeristy, Butler Hall

Josh Bayer’s website

Nathan Bulmer’s website

Presentation on Monday, June 4, 2012 at Columbia University, Butler Hall

Brendan Leach’s website

Karen Green. Tour of Butler Library’s comics collection. Article on Comics NY Symposium

Presentations on Monday, May 21, 2012

Here is a link to a pdf of the original 1988 HOW TO READ NANCY essay by Mark Newgarden.

Mark will be speaking about his upcoming book based on that essay.

Adam McGovern will offer a response to Mark’s presentation and moderate the discussion started last week.

Here’s a link to Yen Yen Woo’s Dim Sum Warriors.

She will be discussing her project and ebook distribution.

And finally a link to Peter Kuper’s website:

He will discuss his work in comics and education.

Presentations on Monday, May 14, 2012

A visual representation of a talk by Nick Sousanis


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