Archives for category: Uncategorized

The eighty-fourth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation by Zoe Beloff. “I will talk about my thoughts on the concept “picture stories” in terms of drawing and film.  I will discuss how these two mediums of expression form a dialog in my work, showing examples from three recent projects. The first, Adventures of a Dreamer by Albert Grass is a comic book that belongs to the archive of the Coney Island Amateur Psychoanalytic Society. The second, “The Days of the Commune” is a project that encompassed drawing, life performance and cinema. Finally I will present fragments of my current work in progress, “The Glass House” a film that speculates on a scenario by Serge Eisenstein which he proposed to Paramount in 1930 and explores his ideas on the interaction of drawing, animation and live action cinema.”

Zoe Beloff works with a wide range of media including film, projection performance, installation and drawing. Her artistic practice is driven by historical research. She is interested in the past as ‘potential’, in bringing to life what might have been and what might yet be, creating proposals for the future. Her work has been featured at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Site Santa Fe, the M HKA museum in Antwerp, and the Pompidou Center in Paris. She has been awarded fellowships from Guggenheim Foundation, The Foundation for Contemporary Arts, The Radcliffe Institute at Harvard and the New York Foundation for the Arts. She is a Professor in the Departments of Media Studies and Art at Queens College CUNY

Dreamer ZoeBeloff smallGlass_ZoeBeloff

 

The eighty-third meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations by William Anthony and Jonathan Bass.

William Anthony, satirical painter, draftsman and “cult  figure” (NY Times) will discuss his work, his mid-60s book A New Approach to Figure Drawing and the inspiration he found in student’s “mistakes.”

William Anthony was born 1934 in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey. While majoring in history at Yale University, Anthony attended a few art courses, one of which was taught by Josef Albers.  After graduating Anthony studied art briefly at schools in New York and California.  In 1962 he taught a course in figure drawing at a commercial art school in San Francisco.  From this experience he wrote a book A New Approach to Figure Drawing  (1965, Crown, NY, and 1967, Odhams, London).  The book’s main idea was to show beginners the mistakes they are likely to make.  This was done with humor and exaggeration to get the point across. Then this idiotic looking at how-not-to draw the figure became the basis of Anthony’s style. In New York Anthony’s work may be found in the Met, the Guggenheim, the Whitney, the Morgan and the Modern as well as 25 other museums both in the US and Europe including the Hermitage.  He has been commissioned to do pages for Artforum, Art in America, The Paris Review and by Andy Warhol for his magazine Interview. Books  of Anthony’s satirical drawings include Bible Stories (Jargon, 1978), Bill Anthony’s Greatest Hits (Jargon, 1988) and  War Is Swell (Smart Art Press, 2000).  In 2013 Sam Jedig  wrote a profusely illustrated book Ironic Icons: The Art of William Anthony.  It currently may be seen at the bookstore at MoMA. Anthony is represented by Stalke Gallery, Kirke Sonnerup, Denmark.

(below) Earthly Delights by William Anthony
willaim anthony earthly delights

Jonathan Bass will focus on experiments in narrative structure and genre in short comics. Examples will include early newspaper comics by R.F. Outcault and Winsor McCay; mid-century comics by John Stanley, Otto Soglow, and Ernie Bushmiller; and contemporary alternative work by Jason, Chris Ware, Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez — as well as the Fight or Run comics of Kevin Huizenga. He will cover approaches to this work that draw on linguistics and anthropology. He’ll also discuss the use he’s made of these approaches in his comics classes.

Jonathan Bass has taught comics courses in the English Department and School of Fine Arts at Rutgers University since 2007.  His own comics and other graphic work can be found at: http://www.tigershorts.com/

buster_brown_postfrom Buster Brown by Outcault

The eighty-second meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 15, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentation: Jeffrey Greene on The Artist in Prison.  The presentation will feature hundreds of images of narrative artworks produced in prison, bodies of work by individual artists assembled over years of incarceration, special projects, publications and exhibition installations illustrating over two decades of fascinating endeavors inside Connecticut’s prisons.

An artist, musician, curator and lecturer, Jeffrey Greene has been organizing visual arts workshops, collectives, projects, programs, exhibitions and publications in prisons (and in the outside community) for the past 23 years.  He has worked directly with over 2,000 inmates and organized well over 250 exhibitions, publications and projects.  He serves as the Prison Arts Program manager for Community Partners in Action, a Hartford, Connecticut organization started in 1875.

Jon-Jay-Arnold-Untitled-web-versiondrawing: Jon Jay Arnold, Untitled, 2009

The eighty-first meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public.

Presentations by Sophie Yanow and Sam Alden

Sophie Yanow will discuss journaling and nonlinear storytelling, and show slides from her new book War of Streets and Houses (Uncivilized Books, 2014), a queer cartoon memoir on urban planning and popular revolt. Sophie Yanow was born north of San Francisco in 1987. In 2011 she moved to Montreal, and with the Colosse collective published In Situ, her acclaimed autobiographical comics series. She was an invited artist-researcher for the Canadian Center for Architecture’s “C for Condo” workshop, and her work has been exhibited throughout the US and Canada. She lives in Montreal.

below: page from War of Streets and Houses by Sophie Yanow

yanow small

Sam Alden‘s talk will focus on what he’s learned in the last year about materials and their effect on a narrative. Sam Alden was born in 1988 in Portland, Oregon. In 2013 he was nominated for three Ignatz Awards, and won for Promising New Talent; his work has since been selected twice for The Best American Comics series. His first collection, It Never Happened Again, is debuting from Uncivilized Books in Spring 2013. Sam lives in Montreal.

below: drawing by Sam Alden

alden image

 

The eightieth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: There is no meeting March 25th. It’s  Spring Break.

Ernie Gehr will present and discuss a selection of his films emphasizing the “animation” of the moving image.  In non-technical terms  one could interpret that as meaning “what have you got between the eyes, and is it of any use”.

Ernie Gehr began to work with film in 1967, and with digital media in 1999.  He has completed approx. 70 works, ranging in duration from 3 to 74 minutes.  For his innovative work, Gehr has received various awards and fellowships, including The Maya Deren Award  from The American Film Institute, The Stan Brakhage Vision Award from the Denver International Film Festival as well as a Guggenheim fellowship.  Over the years Gehr has taught at various schools, including the San Francisco Art Institute, U.C. Berkeley, and most recently at Harvard.  In October of last year a program of his recent works were shown at the New York Film Festival, and an essay on those pieces was published in the January 2014 print issue of Artforum.

SereneVelocity1 72dpistill from Serene Velocity (1970) by Ernie Gehr

The seventy-ninth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Patricia Mainardi on Picture Stories/Stories with Pictures.
At the same time that Rodolfe Topffer was creating his first comic books (1830s), book illustration was undergoing a parallel transformation. New printing techniques encouraged hundreds of illustrations instead of the few characteristic of earlier publications. Artists were now faced with new questions: What to draw? How to draw? How to integrate text and image? Patricia Mainardi will survey the parallel history of illustrated books and comic books, mirror images of each other in their first flower of development.
Patricia Mainardi is an art historian, professor emerita in the doctoral program in art history at the City University of New York . A specialist in nineteenth-century art, she has published numerous books and articles on topics from painting to comics and is currently completing  a book on nineteenth-century illustrated print culture, including comics, caricature, and illustrated books and periodicals.

Johannot Rogue smallIllustration: Tony Johannot, “And so, in the guise of friendship, the villain managed to steal my brain, which he took for himself, for, as my head shrunk in volume, his grew larger.” From Tony Johannot, Alfred de Musset and P.-J. Stahl, Travel Where You Will, Book Written with Pen and Crayon, with Vignettes, Legends, Episodes, Commentaries, Incidents, Notes and Poetry, 1843.
[Tony Johannot, C’est ainsi que, sous la voile de l’amitié, le scélérat vint à bout de s’emparer de ma cervelle, dont il fit son profit, car à mesure que ma tête diminuait de volume, la sienne grossissait….   Tony Johannot, Alfred de Musset and P.-J. Stahl, Voyage où il vous plaira, livre écrit à la plume et au crayon, avec vignettes, légendes, épisodes, commentaires, incidents, notes et poésie, 1843]

The seventy-eighth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentations: Huguette Martel on her work and Michael Lobel on John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration.

Huguette Martel will present some of her New Yorker cartoons as well as her most recent narrative work: The Adventures of a would-be Filmmaker. Her main concern is the relationship between pictures and text and also how to tell very personal stories in a discreet, hopefully humorous way. Huguette Martel was born in France in 1938; the daughter of Lithuanian Jews, she spent World War II hiding with a  peasant family.  She’s been living in New York since she was 19. A graduate from Cooper Union, she started by doing large abstract-expressionist paintings. For the last 25 years, she has concentrated on narrative paintings:  painted images combined with a painted texts on canvas.  In the early 90s, the New Yorker magazine published a series of her cartoons and full-color pages.  She has shown in several galleries; in 2007, she had a one-man show in at Congregation Beth Elohim in Brooklyn, NY. Lately, she’s gone from wall paintings to a smaller format designed for books.

Michael Lobel on John Sloan: Drawing on Illustration. This talk will explore the importance of illustration to 20th-century American artist John Sloan’s artistic career. Better known as a member of The Eight and the Ashcan School, Sloan began his professional life as a commercial illustrator, working for more than a decade on newspapers like the Philadelphia Press and later for mass-market magazines. The talk will include numerous archival images, including newspaper word puzzles and comic strips, which will be used to highlight Sloan’s distinctive approach and to provide further insight into illustration as a modern visual form.  Michael Lobel is a professor of art history and director of the MA Program in Modern and Contemporary Art, Criticism and Theory at Purchase College, SUNY. In addition to regular exhibition catalog essays and articles on modern and contemporary art, his publications include three books: Image Duplicator: Roy Lichtenstein and the Emergence of Pop Art (2002); James Rosenquist: Pop Art, Politics and History in the 1960s (2009); and John Sloan:Drawing on Illustration, recently published by Yale University Press.

cowspainting by Huguette Martel

Lobel_Sloan_cover

The seventy-seventh meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 7:00 PM at The New School, Room A404 at 66 West 12th St., New York City. Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: This event is taking place at Johnson/Kaplan Hall of The New School.

Presentation: Matthew Thurber on “Secrets of INFOMANIACS, or How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cloud.” Matthew Thurber started posting a webcomic about the internet in February 2011, starring Ralph, an online-addicted youth with a hard drive in his forehead, and Amy Shit, an activist rapper whose parents have mysteriously vanished. INFOMANIACS quickly developed into a densely layered spy thriller dealing with issues of privacy and control. Eerily foreshadowing headlines with Snowden and Wikileaks soon to be splattered everywhere, INFOMANIACS was released in October 2013 by PictureBox (soon to cease publishing…coincidence?) Learn the intriguing backstory of this comic strip: the shadowy meetings with librarians, the influence of unlikely muses such as  Dave Berg, the dropboxes that “fell off a truck”, clandestine schemes for embedding real people into the strip, and plotting techniques which nearly caused a nervous breakdown!

Matthew Thurber is an artist and musician living in Brooklyn. He is the author of numerous comics including 1-800-MICE and INFOMANIACS. Thurber is the co-founder of Tomato House gallery and of the Potlatch, I Gather books-on-tape label. He performs as Ambergris, and with Brian Belott as Court Stenographer and Young Sherlock Holmes. http://www.matthewthurber.com

a7

The seventy-sixth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Jennifer George and Charles Kochman on The Art of Rube Goldberg. Not many of us make it into the dictionary as an adjective. But then again, Rube Goldberg was no ordinary noun. He was a cartoonist, humorist, sculptor, author, engineer, and inventor, and in a 72-year career he wrote and illustrated nearly 50,000 cartoons which were syndicated in daily newspapers throughout the world. In The Art of Rube Goldberg (Abrams ComicArts) author Jennifer George celebrates all aspects of her grandfather’s life by showcasing more than seven hundred illustrations, alongside an introduction by bestselling author Adam Gopnik and other essayists, providing a definitive look at this quintessential American cartoonist.

Jennifer George is the granddaughter of Rube Goldberg. She is a writer and a jewelry and clothing designer. For almost twenty years her label was carried at Bergdorf Goodman, Barney’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdales, and dozens of other specialty stores across the U.S. She lives in New York City.

Charles Kochman is the editorial director of Abrams ComicArts, and editor of the #1 bestselling series Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney. Kochman has edited several hundred books for all age groups. Prior to Abrams, Kochman was the first editor of licensed publishing at DC Comics and MAD magazine.
rubegoldberg cover72

The seventy-fifth meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 7:00 PM at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. PLEASE NOTE: Events this semester will take place on Tuesday evenings.

Presentation: Mark Alan Stamaty on his life, his work and other metaphysical questions.

Mark Alan Stamaty was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1947. He grew up in a New Jersey beach town, the only child of two professional cartoonists. He attended Cooper Union where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1969.
Mark is the author-illustrator of ten books. His children’s books include Who Needs Donuts? (1973, 2003), Alia’s Mission (2005), Too Many Time Machines (1999), Small in the Saddle (1975), Minnie Maloney & Macaroni (1976), and Where’s My Hippopotamus?(1977).
In 1977–1978, Mark’s panoramic centerfold cartoons of Greenwich Village and Times Square for the Village Voice attracted widespread attention and were sold by the Village Voice as posters. He then created a series of comic strips for that paper, including MacDoodle St., which was later published as a comic strip novel.
In 1981 Meg Greenfield, editorial page editor of the Washington Post, asked Mark to create a comic strip about Washington for her op-ed page. Mark traveled to D.C. to do extensive research, and in November of that year the Post and the Village Voice jointly debuted his new creation, Washingtoon, featuring, among many other characters, Congressman Bob Forehead, chairman of the JFK-Look-Alike Caucus. The comic strip’s popularity with Post and Voice readers led to its being picked up by more than 40 newspapers, including the Boston Globe, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and the Austin-American Statesman.
From 1994 to 1996, Mark was the political cartoonist for Time Magazine. From 2001 to 2003, he produced the monthly comic strip Boox for the New York Times Book Review. His cartoon reporting has covered a variety of events for GQMagazine and The New Yorker, including men’s fashion shows in Milan, the 2001 Baseball All-Star Game, the Washington Redskins’ training camp, the Madison Square Garden 1992 25th-Anniversary Concert honoring Bob Dylan, the buzz around Washington during President Clinton’s grand jury testimony, a UFO convention, and many more.
Mark has created covers for The New Yorker, the New Republic, the Washington Post Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, and others. His cartoons and illustrations have appeared in many publications, including Slate Magazine, Esquire, New York Magazine, Harper’s, Newsweek, Playboy, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times Magazine.
Mark’ was the recipient of two Gold Medals and a Silver Medal from the Society of Illustrators, the Premio “Satira Politica” Forte Dei Marmi 2005 from the Museum of Satire in Forte Dei Marmi, Italy, and a Page One Award from the Newspaper Guild of New York. His illustrations have been selected for the Communication Arts Annual and the American Illustration Annual.
In 2005, Mark produced a series of full-color comic strips and  commentary on the Los Angeles mayoral campaign for the Los Angeles Times. In 2007, Mark received the Augustus Saint Gaudens Award for Career Achievement in Art from Cooper Union. Presently, his work includes fulfilling a two-book contract with Knopf Children’s Books and a variety of free-lance assignments.

stamaty detailMark Alan Stamaty, A Cartoon Legacy (detail), from The New Yorker, 2011

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 48 other followers