The 110th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, December 2, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Presentation: Marguerite Van Cook on The Late Child and Other Animals.

Marguerite Van Cook will read from and discuss her original graphic auto/biography The Late Child and Other Animals, accompanied by a slide show of images from the book. The book is written and colored by Van Cook and adapted to the comics form and drawn by artist James Romberger.

A decade after Hetty Martin survives the bombing of Portsmouth by the Nazis in World War II, she gives birth to a child out of wedlock, Marguerite. Now Hetty must go before a tribunal to prove that she is a fit mother. From there, The Late Child and Other Animals tells the story of Marguerite’s childhood in the recovering British naval port and the rural beauty of the Isle of Wight and in Normandy, France. The journeys and struggles over decades of this mother and daughter are linked in five episodes that veer between lyricism, wry wit, and harrowing suspense.

Marguerite Van Cook came to New York her punk with band The Innocents, after touring the UK with The Clash. She stayed and opened the seminal installation gallery Ground Zero with her partner James Romberger. Her own works as an artist and filmmaker have placed her in many museum collections.
Her current generational graphic memoir The Late Child and Other Animals with James Romberger (Fantagraphics) has been translated and published in France under the title L’Enfant inattendue. Her color work on the graphic memoir 7 Miles a Second, a collaborative project with James Romberger and the late David Wojnarowicz garnered her a nomination for an 2014 Eisner award for Best Painter/Multimedia Artist.
Website: http://margueritevancook.com/

James Romberger‘s ecological comic Post York was published in 2012 by Uncivilized Books; it includes a flexi-disc by his son Crosby and it was nominated for an 2013 Eisner award for Best Single Issue. Romberger collaborated with Marguerite Van Cook and the late writer, artist and AIDS activist David Wojnarowicz on the critically acclaimed graphic novel 7 Miles A Second, which was first published in 1996 by DC/Vertigo and then released in a revised, expanded edition in February 2013 by Fantagraphics Books.
Website: http://jamesromberger.com/

Late cover

 

The 109th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 25, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Abigail Zitin on William Hogarth: Narrative Art and Visual Pleasure.

British artist William Hogarth (1697–1763) is, arguably, the ur–graphic novelist, famous above all for pioneering the form of the pictorial narrative series (for instance, in A Harlot’s Progress and The Rake’s Progress). For this reason, his work has always been championed by literary critics, particularly those committed to thinking about textuality across media as well as the development of the novel form in English literature. But in addition to his popular graphic works, Hogarth also published The Analysis of Beauty, an essay whose main arguments often seem at odds with the images for which he is best known. In the Analysis, Hogarth defines beauty abstractly, as an effect of lines and spatial relationships rather than representational content; he has remarkably little to say about storytelling, visual or otherwise. This presentation explores the disconnect between Hogarth’s theory and his reputation as a virtuoso of visual narrative, asking howand whetherwe should reconcile the visual style of by this famously literary artist with the formal principles he seems to have held dear. I approach this question by looking closely at how Hogarth talks about technique: both his careful attention to the mechanical practices of drawing, sculpting, and engravingeven boxing and dancingand his evident insecurity about expressing his ideas verbally. Hogarth never lets his reader forget that he is not a writer, and this self-consciousness, I argue, should prompt a reexamination of what it might mean to describe him (whether appreciatively or critically) as a literary artist.

Abigail Zitin is Assistant Professor of English at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ and the 2014–15 Carol G. Lederer Postdoctoral Fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women at Brown University. She studies aesthetics, visual culture, and literary criticism in eighteenth-century Britain; her research focuses on Hogarth’s Analysis of Beauty and the history of formalism. A recent essay on Hogarth’s aesthetics appeared in Eighteenth-Century Studies; another is forthcoming in ELH.

hogarth image

The 108th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 18, 2014 at 8 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 8 pm starting time.

Hanneriina Moisseinen interviewed by Bill Kartalopoulos. Hanneriina will discuss her recent work and show a trailer for the documentary Laulu: http://www.tuffifilms.com/documentary

The comic artist Hanneriina Moisseinen (born in Joensuu, Finland in 1978) has an artistic background in fine arts, especially drawing, sculpting and installation, but she has been doing comics since her teenage years.
Moisseinen’s debut album Sen synty (2005) is a collection of illustrated old folktales from the Viena Karelia area. The follow-up, Setit ja partituurit / Sets and Scores (2010), contains more contemporary stories about embarrassing situations in daily life. Isä / Father (2013) tells a real life story how a father of a family disappears with no reason, and is never found again. The themes in her stories are serious, but many times the humor bursts out in unexpected ways.
In the recent years, Moisseinen has been challenging the limits of comic expression by including sewing and embroidery in her work. The technique is slow but produces a strong emotional effect. At the moment she is working on her fourth comic album about cows and other animals in the Second World War.
Hanneriina-Moisseinen_Father_2

The 107th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 11, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Dr. Pamala Rogers on “Outside the Box: Comics and Storytelling in Outsider Art.”
Dr. Pamala Rogers will discuss self taught artists who use text and storytelling in their work.  Two short films will be shown that illustrate the use of personal narrative in the work of outsider artists who are represented by Pure Vision Arts.

Pamala Rogers, Ed.D. NCPsyA, LP, Director
 Pure Vision Arts studio and Expressive Art Program’s. Dr. Pamala Rogers is an artist, an arts educator and a licensed psychoanalyst who is a foremost authority on supporting the creative process among people with neurodevelopmental challenges. She has a Doctorate in Art Education from Columbia University’s Teachers College and is a graduate of The Institute for Expressive Analysis. As Director of the Pure Vision Arts studio in Manhattan she oversees all aspects of the PVA program as well as a wide range of The Shield arts programs for children and adults. progers@shield.org

Leon wonder woman 72dpi

Leon McCutcheon, Wonder Woman, Acrylic on Canvas, 30” x 40”, 2009.

A SPECIAL meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on WEDNESDAY, November 5, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Presentation: Olivier Schrauwen on his work.

Olivier Schrauwen will discuss the books he’s made since his debut collection, My Boy, focusing on his latest book Arsène Schrauwen. This book is presented as an autobiography of his grandfather, but is, in fact, a concoction of personal anecdotes, fantasy and nonsense. Schrauwen will discuss its origins, his influences and some of the thought processes that went into the the making of this book.

Olivier Schrauwen was born in 1977 in Bruges, Belgium. He studied and worked as an animator for ten years, while doing comics for various small press publications on the side. After the publication of his first book in 2006, he began to focus on his comics work.schrauwen image

 

The 106th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Marlene Villalobos Hennessy on “Chameleon Images in the Late Medieval Religious Cartoon.”
My talk examines a range of late medieval illustrated religious texts or ‘cartoons’ in which artists and illuminators converted letters, words, and even phrases into visual images.  Several of the ‘cartoons’ I discuss show words and pictures in the process of transmutation into one another, revealing the image’s capacity for shifting, ever-changing, often textualized permutation. By looking at this rare, exceptional, or enigmatic iconography in a group of mostly understudied late medieval British manuscripts, this talk identifies and explains how medieval manuscript artists took on this subject and captured some of these enigmatic transformations.  Hence maim is to unravel some of the networks of association between words and pictures, devotional readers and monastic artists, in a range of illustrated late medieval religious cartoons.

Marlene Villalobos Hennessy is Associate Professor in the Department of English at Hunter College, CUNY, where she teaches classes on Medieval Literature, Visual Culture, and the History of the Book.  She has published numerous articles on late medieval British manuscripts and religious culture and has  edited a collection of essays, English Medieval Manuscripts:  Readers, Makers and Illuminators (London and Turnhout: Harvey Miller/Brepols, 2009).  She is currently completing research on a reference work entitled An Index of Images in English Manuscripts from the Time of Chaucer to Henry VIII, c.1380 – c.1509: The Scottish Libraries and Collections, as well as a book-length project, Blood Writing: Manuscripts and Metaphors in the Late Middle Ages.

hennessey image 2 good

The 105th meeting of the NY Comics & Picture-story Symposium will be held on Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 7 pm at Parsons The New School, 2 West 13th Street, in the Bark Room (off the lobby). Free and open to the public. Please note 7 pm starting time.

Eddy Portnoy: A Brief History of Yiddish Cartooning
Jews and cartoons have an unusual relationship. Initially, Jews were the victims of a particularly virulent anti-Jewish caricature, and did not engage the form within the context of their own culture until the second half of the nineteenth century in the Yiddish press. Though little known, the cartoons of the Yiddish press serve as a pre-history to subsequent activity in the field by Jewish artists.

Eddy Portnoy teaches in the Judaic Studies program at Rutgers University and also serves as the academic advisor at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. In addition to curating exhibits, he writes and lectures on Jewish popular culture.

portnoy imageForverts, c 1917.

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